No. 08-964
In the Supreme Court of the United States
BERNARD L. BILSKI AND RAND A. WARSAW,
Petitioners,
v.
JOHN J. DOLL, ACTING UNDER SECRETARY OF
COMMERCE FOR INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND
ACTING DIRECTOR OF THE UNITED STATES PATENT
AND TRADEMARK OFFICE,
Respondent.
On Writ of Certiorari to
the United States Court of Appeals
for the Federal Circuit
BRIEF FOR THE BUSINESS SOFTWARE
ALLIANCE AS AMICUS CURIAE
IN SUPPORT OF AFFIRMANCE
ANDREW J. PINCUS
Counsel of Record
DAN HIMMELFARB
BRIAN D. NETTER
Mayer Brown LLP
1909 K Street, NW
Washington, DC 20006
(202) 263-3000
Counsel for Amicus Curiae
Business Software Alliance

i
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
TABLE OF AUTHORITIES...................................... iii
INTEREST OF AMICUS CURIAE ............................1
INTRODUCTION AND
SUMMARY OF ARGUMENT.....................................2
ARGUMENT................................................................4
I. SECTION 101 HAS CONSISTENTLY—
AND CORRECTLY—BEEN
INTERPRETED TO ENCOMPASS
SOFTWARE-IMPLEMENTED
INVENTIONS. .......................................................4
A. Patents For Software-Implemented
Inventions Provide Important Benefits
To The Economy And Society At Large. ..........5
B. This Court Should Not Interpret Section
101 In A Manner That Upsets Settled
Expectations And Has Unnecessary
Economic Consequences...................................8
II. THE FEDERAL CIRCUIT’S UNDULY
NARROW TEST FOR PATENTABLE
SUBJECT MATTER IS INCONSISTENT
WITH THIS COURT’S PRECEDENTS. .............10
A. This Court’s Holdings That Patents
May Not Encompass “Laws Of Nature,
Natural Phenomena, And Abstract
Ideas” Dispose Of Petitioners’ Claim.............11
1. Section 101 defines the patent
franchise broadly but excludes the
scientific foundation for innovation..........11
2. Preemption analysis can be used
successfully to identify non-
patentable subject matter. ........................14

ii
TABLE OF CONTENTS—continued
Page
3. The Bilski patent fails preemption
analysis......................................................16
B. This Court Has Rejected Artificial
Limits On What Constitutes A
“Process.”.........................................................18
1. This Court has never required a
“process” to be tied to an apparatus
or to be transformative to be
patentable..................................................18
2. The statutory term “process” should
be interpreted broadly...............................20
C. The Federal Circuit’s Narrow Standard
Creates Needless Uncertainty About
Patentable Subject Matter. ............................22
D. The Proper Standard Should
Acknowledge The Role Of Section 101
Patentability As A Threshold
Determination.................................................26
CONCLUSION ..........................................................27

iii
TABLE OF AUTHORITIES
Page(s)
CASES
Arizona v. Rumsey,
467 U.S. 203 (1984)................................................8
Bonito Boats, Inc. v. Thunder Craft Boats,
Inc., 489 U.S. 141 (1989)......................................20
Cochrane v. Deener,
94 U.S. 780 (1877).............................. 18, 19, 23, 26
CyberSource Corp. v. Retail Decisions, Inc.,
620 F. Supp. 2d 1068 (N.D. Cal. 2009)................25
Diamond v. Chakrabarty,
447 U.S. 303 (1980)............................ 12, 13, 20, 27
Diamond v. Diehr,
450 U.S. 175 (1981)...................................... passim
Eolas Techs., Inc. v. Microsoft Corp.,
399 F.3d 1325 (Fed. Cir. 2005) ............................24
Ex parte Motoyama,
2009 WL 524946 (B.P.A.I. Feb. 27, 2009) ...........24
Ex parte Petculescu,
2009 WL 1718896 (B.P.A.I. June 4, 2009) ..........24
Ex parte Scholl,
2009 WL 288204 (B.P.A.I. Feb. 4, 2009) .............24
Festo Corp. v. Shoketsu Kinzoku Kogyo
Kabushiki Co., 535 U.S. 722 (2002).......................9
Funk Bros. Seed Co. v. Kalo Inoculant Co.,
333 U.S. 127 (1948)..............................................12
Gottschalk v. Benson,
409 U.S. 63 (1972)........................................ passim

iv
TABLE OF AUTHORITIES—continued
Page(s)
Harper & Row Publishers, Inc. v. Nation
Enters., 471 U.S. 539 (1985) ................................12
In re Alappat,
33 F.3d 1526 (Fed. Cir. 1994) (en banc) ..............24
In re Bergy,
596 F.2d 952, 990 (C.C.P.A. 1979).......................13
In re Grams,
888 F.2d 835 (Fed. Cir. 1989) ..............................15
In re Maucorps,
609 F.2d 481 (C.C.P.A. 1979)...............................15
In re Meyer,
688 F.2d 789 (C.C.P.A. 1982)...............................15
In re Morris,
127 F.3d 1048 (Fed. Cir. 1997) ............................17
In re Prater,
415 F.2d 1378, 1387–1388 (C.C.P.A. 1968),
aff’d in part and rev’d in part on reh’g,
415 F.2d 1393 (C.C.P.A. 1969).............................23
In re Schrader,
22 F.3d 290 (Fed. Cir. 1994) ................................15
In re Warmerdam,
33 F.3d 1354 (Fed. Cir. 1994) ........................14, 15
J.E.M. Ag Supply, Inc. v. Pioneer Hi-Bred
Int’l, Inc., 534 U.S. 124 (2001).............................20
KSR International Co. v. Teleflex Inc.,
550 U.S. 398 (2007)..............................................21

v
TABLE OF AUTHORITIES—continued
Page(s)
Laboratory Corp. of America Holdings v.
Metabolite Laboratories, Inc.,
548 U.S. 124 (2006)..............................................14
Mackay Radio & Tel. Co. v. Radio Corp. of
Am., 306 U.S. 86 (1939) .......................................12
O’Reilly v. Morse,
56 U.S. (15 How.) 62 (1854) ...........................13, 17
Parker v. Flook,
437 U.S. 584 (1978)........................................11, 19
Patterson v. McLean Credit Union,
491 U.S. 164 (1989)................................................9
Payne v. Tennessee,
501 U.S. 808 (1991)............................................8, 9
Pearson v. Callahan,
129 S. Ct. 808 (2009)..............................................9
Rubber-Tip Pencil Co. v. Howard,
87 U.S. (20 Wall.) 498 (1874)...............................11
Shepard v. United States,
544 U.S. 13 (2005)..................................................9
The Telephone Cases,
126 U.S. 1 (1888)..................................................17
Tilghman v. Proctor,
102 U.S. 707 (1881)........................................12, 13
United States v. Dubilier Condenser Corp.,
289 U.S. 178 (1933)..............................................20
Warner-Jenkinson Co. v. Hilton Davis Chem.
Co., 520 U.S. 17 (1997)...........................................9

vi
TABLE OF AUTHORITIES—continued
Page(s)
CONSTITUTION & STATUTES
U.S. CONST. art. I, § 8, cl. 8 .....................................2, 3
17 U.S.C. § 102(b)................................................12, 21
35 U.S.C. § 101 .................................................. passim
35 U.S.C. § 102 ......................................................3, 26
35 U.S.C. § 103 ................................................3, 21, 26
35 U.S.C. § 112 ......................................................3, 26
42 U.S.C. § 2181(a)....................................................21
MISCELLANEOUS
Robert D. Atkinson & Andrew S. McKay,
Digital Prosperity: Understanding the
Economic Benefits of the Information
Technology Revolution 10 (Info. Tech. &
Innovation Found. 2007),
http://www.itif.org/files/
digital_prosperity.pdf............................................. 6
James E. Bessen & Robert M. Hunt, An Em-
pirical Look at Software Patents, 16 J.
ECON. & MGMT. STRATEGY 157 (2007)....................6
Business Software Alliance, Innovation
Nation, SOLUTIONS MAGAZINE, June 2009,
http://www.bsa.org/country/
Public%20Policy/~/media/Files/Policy/
Solutions/Solutions_Magazine_1.ashx..................6

vii
TABLE OF AUTHORITIES—continued
Page(s)
Business Software Alliance, Patent Reform:
The Verdict Is In (2007),
http://www.bsa.org/~/media/
63E3364BBA7148828D2CE
880AF5371D2.ashx................................................6
Julie E. Cohen & Mark A. Lemley, Patent
Scope and Innovation in the Software
Industry, 89 CAL. L. REV. 1 (2001).....................6, 8
H.R. REP. NO. 82-1923 (1952)....................................20
Erik S. Maurer, Note, An Economic
Justification for a Broad Interpretation of
Patentable Subject Matter, 95 NW. U. L.
REV. 1057 (2001) ....................................................7
Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and
Development, Measuring the Information
Economy 11 (2002), http://www.oecd.org/
dataoecd/16/14/1835738.pdf...................................5
S. REP. NO. 82-1979 (1952) ........................................20
Bradford L. Smith & Susan O. Mann,
Innovation and Intellectual Property in the
Software Industry: An Emerging Role for
Patents?, 71 U. CHI. L. REV. 241 (2004).................7
U.S. Congress, Office of Technology Assess-
ment, Finding a Balance: Computer Soft-
ware, Intellectual Property and the Chal-
lenge of Technological Change (1992) ...................7

viii
TABLE OF AUTHORITIES—continued
Page(s)
WEBSTER’S NEW INTERNATIONAL DICTIONARY
(2d ed. 1950) .........................................................21
(3d ed. 1986) .........................................................21

BRIEF FOR THE BUSINESS SOFTWARE
ALLIANCE AS AMICUS CURIAE
IN SUPPORT OF NEITHER PARTY
INTEREST OF AMICUS CURIAE
The Business Software Alliance (BSA) is an asso-
ciation of the world’s leading software and hardware
technology companies. On behalf of its members,
BSA promotes policies that foster innovation,
growth, and a competitive marketplace for commer-
cial software and related technologies. BSA mem-
bers pursue patent protection for their intellectual
property and as a group hold a significant number of
patents. Because patent policy is vitally important
to promoting the innovation that has kept the United
States at the forefront of software and hardware de-
velopment, BSA members have a strong stake in the
proper functioning of the U.S. patent system.
The members of the BSA are Adobe, Apple,
Autodesk, Bentley Systems, CA, Cadence Design
Systems, Cisco Systems, Corel, CyberLink, Dell,
Embarcadero Technologies, HP, IBM, Intel, Intuit,
McAfee, Microsoft, Minitab, Quark, Quest Software,
Rosetta Stone, SAP, Siemens, SolidWorks, Sybase,
Symantec, Synopsys, and The MathWorks.1
1 Pursuant to this Court’s Rule 37.6, amicus affirms that no
counsel for a party authored this brief in whole or in part and
that no person other than amicus and its counsel made a mone-
tary contribution to its preparation or submission. The parties’
letters consenting to the filing of this brief have been filed with
the Clerk’s office.

2
INTRODUCTION AND
SUMMARY OF ARGUMENT
If innovation is the engine of the American econ-
omy, then intellectual property is its fuel. From the
time of the Founding, it has been understood that, to
“promote the progress of * * * useful arts,” U.S.
CONST. art. I, § 8, cl. 8, economic incentives must be
provided to those who develop new inventions.
At one point in the Nation’s history, those inven-
tions involved methods for forging iron or harnessing
the illuminating capacity of tungsten. Innovation
takes more varied forms today. Computers, for ex-
ample, are an ever-present feature of modern life and
modern industry, and they perform a myriad of use-
ful functions through the interaction between hard-
ware and software. Much innovation today arises
from the expanded use and sophistication of com-
puters and the software that directs their operations.
The Patent Act is not so limited that it impedes the
progress of these new technologies. To the contrary,
the patent system was developed to foster such inno-
vation.
The importance of technological innovation to the
growth of the American economy and the continued
success of American industry cannot be overstated.
Undue narrowing of the scope of patent protection
would produce a concomitant reduction in innova-
tion, with adverse effects on the entire economy. At
the same time, an interpretation of patentable sub-
ject matter that extends to laws of nature and ab-
stract ideas could deter innovation by blocking de-
velopment of new technologies.
In interpreting the scope of 35 U.S.C. § 101, this
Court should be mindful of its long tradition of vindi-

3
cating the purposes of the Patent Act. Throughout
its history, this Court has been careful to protect
avenues for innovation while limiting efforts to claim
entire fields of scientific discovery.
Those dual
guideposts stem directly from Section 101, which au-
thorizes patents for “any new and useful process,
machine, manufacture, or composition of matter.”
This language is broad but not infinite. Likewise, its
role is important but not exclusive. The fundamental
purpose of Section 101 is to establish the scope of the
“useful arts,” U.S. CONST. art. I, § 8, cl. 8, not to filter
out every unjustified patent claim.
An invention
that qualifies as patentable subject matter may re-
ceive a patent only if in addition it satisfies the re-
quirements of novelty, nonobviousness, and enable-
ment. 35 U.S.C. §§ 102, 103, 112.
Courts have consistently, and correctly, con-
cluded that—except in narrow circumstances—
software-implemented inventions satisfy Section 101.
That conclusion is legally correct and economically
essential, and it should be reaffirmed by this Court.
The decision below does not disturb the Federal Cir-
cuit’s understanding that Section 101 extends to in-
ventions implemented by computer software. How-
ever, in adopting its machine-or-transformation test,
the Federal Circuit unduly narrowed the scope of
patent protection for future technological advances
and failed in its effort to bring clarity to Section 101.
This Court has never endorsed the machine-or-
transformation test as an indispensable criterion for
satisfying Section 101. Instead, the proper focus is
whether a patent claim would control all applications
of a law of nature, a natural phenomenon, or an ab-
stract idea—the fundamental building blocks of in-
novation that no person has invented and no person
should control.

4
Petitioners’ claim fails that test, because they
seek a patent that would preempt the entire concept
of hedging. Accordingly, the judgment of the Federal
Circuit should be affirmed. In reaching the correct
result, however, the Federal Circuit employed the
wrong standard, introducing inappropriate and un-
necessary obstacles that could impede future techno-
logical development in new fields of innovation.
The judgment below should therefore be upheld
only after this Court removes the Federal Circuit’s
ill-advised limitations on Section 101. In so doing,
the Court should reaffirm that the patent system
remains open to critical areas of developing technol-
ogy such as inventions implemented by computer
software.
ARGUMENT
I. SECTION 101 HAS CONSISTENTLY—AND
CORRECTLY—BEEN INTERPRETED TO
ENCOMPASS SOFTWARE-IMPLEMENTED
INVENTIONS.
Software-implemented inventions have had, and
continue to have, a profound impact on the American
economy. And patent protection is a critical compo-
nent of the information economy’s success. Indeed,
both the legal and the economic systems have ac-
cepted and relied upon the patentability of machines
and processes implemented through software. In as-
sessing the scope of Section 101, therefore, this Court
should be mindful of settled expectations and avoid
interpreting Section 101 in a manner that would de-
feat those expectations and undermine a major area
of innovation.

5
A. Patents For Software-Implemented In-
ventions Provide Important Benefits To
The Economy And Society At Large.
Much like the other “useful arts,” innovations in
software technology bring important advances to the
American economy. Computer software is now used
not just for word processing and calculating spread-
sheets but also for designing bridges, diagnosing dis-
eases, and directing our energy infrastructure. Most
of the technologies that we encounter every day—
from cellular phones and antilock brakes to airplane
flight controls and pacemakers—require computers
and software and incorporate technological ad-
vancements. The automation of previously manual
tasks through computer software has improved qual-
ity, consistency, efficiency, and access to a wide vari-
ety of products and services, such that the vast ma-
jority of patents on software-implemented inventions
go to companies in the manufacturing sector. In
short, “[t]oday’s software transforms our lives with-
out physical anchors.” Pet. App. 143a (Rader, J., dis-
senting).
Investment in software reflects its increasing
importance to American industry. In 2000, software
represented nearly 15% of non-residential fixed capi-
tal investment in the entire economy, up from only
3% in 1980.
Organisation for Economic Co-
Operation and Development, Measuring the Informa-
tion Economy 11 (2002), http://www.oecd.org/data-
oecd/16/14/1835738.pdf. On a broader level, the in-
formation technology industry has been described as
“the key factor responsible for reversing the 20-year
productivity slow-down from the mid-1970s to the
mid-1990s and in driving today’s robust productivity
growth.” Pet. App. 94a (Newman, J., dissenting)

6
(quoting Robert D. Atkinson & Andrew S. McKay,
Digital Prosperity: Understanding the Economic
Benefits of the Information Technology Revolution 10
(Info.
Tech.
&
Innovation
Found.
2007),
http://www.itif.org/files/digital_prosperity.pdf).
Industry estimates suggest that 20,000 new pat-
ent applications for software-implemented inventions
are granted each year, James E. Bessen & Robert M.
Hunt, An Empirical Look at Software Patents, 16 J.
ECON. & MGMT. STRATEGY 157, 158 (2007). “[B]oth
economic theory and practical experience suggest
that the availability of patents for software promotes
innovation by supplying (additional) incentives to in-
ventors.” Julie E. Cohen & Mark A. Lemley, Patent
Scope and Innovation in the Software Industry, 89
CAL. L. REV. 1, 5 (2001).
BSA member companies exemplify the principle
that patent protection creates an environment con-
ducive to the pursuit of innovation—each year, they
spend in excess of $32 billion on research and devel-
opment to expand their innovation portfolios. See
BSA, Patent Reform: The Verdict Is In 4 (2007),
http://www.bsa.org/~/media/63E3364BBA7148828D2
CE880AF5371D2.ashx. For example, these compa-
nies are pursuing breakthroughs that will provide
doctors with access to “previously unimaginable
amounts of clinical data” through advances in cloud
computing, help water supply networks to identify
the leaks in their infrastructure that result in the
loss of 26% of treated water, and allow printers to
generate three-dimensional objects. BSA, Innovation
Nation, SOLUTIONS MAGAZINE, June 2009, at 3, 4, 7,
http://www.bsa.org/country/Public%20Policy/~/media
/Files/Policy/Solutions/Solutions_Magazine_1.ashx.

7
None of these pursuits would be possible without
software.
As early as 1992, congressional reports recog-
nized that “patent protection is of importance to the
U.S. software industry, both domestically and in the
global market.” U.S. Congress, Office of Technology
Assessment, Finding a Balance: Computer Software,
Intellectual Property and the Challenge of Techno-
logical Change 23 (1992). Without intellectual prop-
erty protection, prospective software entrepreneurs
face serious risks that competitors will free-ride on
their innovations by pilfering the essential elements
of a software program. See, e.g., Bradford L. Smith
& Susan O. Mann, Innovation and Intellectual Prop-
erty in the Software Industry: An Emerging Role for
Patents?, 71 U. CHI. L. REV. 241, 241–242 (2004).
This free-riding comes at the expense of the inven-
tor’s return on his investment.
Conversely, with
proper protection, potential innovators are motivated
to pursue new inventions and to proceed to commer-
cial development to collect their economic rewards.
Id. at 256–257; see also Erik S. Maurer, Note, An
Economic Justification for a Broad Interpretation of
Patentable Subject Matter, 95 NW. U. L. REV. 1057,
1087–1088 (2001).2
2 Software entrepreneurs are also harmed when identical cop-
ies of finished programs are duplicated in what, under the cur-
rent intellectual property regime, constitutes illegal piracy. Pi-
racy is sometimes combated through the Copyright Act, which
protects “the author’s original expression of an idea.” Smith &
Mann, supra, at 256. However, copyright law does not prevent
a competitor from extracting the innovative elements of soft-
ware and incorporating them into a new creative shell. Patent
protection is necessary for an inventor to “protect the actual in-
vention, not just a single implementation of it.” Ibid.

8
Simple economics suggests that, if patent protec-
tion for software were curtailed, the adverse conse-
quences would be swift and severe. With less profit
to capture from the commercialization of the fruits of
research and development, businesses would divert
their resources into other ventures, and software de-
velopment would suffer. That would have a ripple ef-
fect on economic productivity. Advanced software al-
lows factory workers to be more precise, cars more
fuel efficient, and healthcare more effective. Any
new obstacles to software development would carry a
penalizing multiplier effect that could threaten the
continued technological advantage of the United
States.
B. This Court Should Not Interpret Section
101 In A Manner That Upsets Settled
Expectations And Has Harmful Eco-
nomic Consequences.
Because so much has already been invested in
computer software, both in resources and in man-
power, this Court should be careful not to upset this
settled industry of innovators by narrowing Section
101. See, e.g., Cohen & Lemley, supra, at 4 (“With
some eighty thousand software patents already is-
sued * * * software patentability is a matter for the
history books.”). This necessity is driven both by the
legal imperative of statutory stare decisis and by the
extra force this doctrine carries in light of the par-
ticularly severe costs of upsetting patent expecta-
tions.
Stare decisis “promotes the evenhanded, predict-
able, and consistent development of legal principles,
fosters reliance on judicial decisions, and contributes
to the actual and perceived integrity of the judicial
process.” Payne v. Tennessee, 501 U.S. 808, 827

9
(1991). Departure from settled precedent always re-
quires “special justification,” Arizona v. Rumsey, 467
U.S. 203, 212 (1984), and “[c]onsiderations in favor of
stare decisis are at their acme in cases involving
property and contract rights, where reliance inter-
ests are involved,” Pearson v. Callahan, 129 S. Ct.
808, 816 (2009) (quoting Payne, 501 U.S. at 828).
Among property rights, intellectual property invites
particularly strong reliance. Moreover, “[c]onsid-
erations of stare decisis have special force in the area
of statutory interpretation, for here, unlike in the
context of constitutional interpretation, the legisla-
tive power is implicated, and Congress remains free
to alter what [the courts] have done.” Shepard v.
United States, 544 U.S. 13, 23 (2005) (quoting Patter-
son v. McLean Credit Union, 491 U.S. 164, 172–173
(1989)).
Thus, where decisions interpreting a statute con-
cern a right in intellectual property, stare decisis
concerns apply with the greatest possible force. This
Court has spoken on several occasions about the
scope of Section 101. A dramatic change in patent
law might invalidate certain patents notwithstand-
ing the fact that—had the law imposed different re-
quirements—claims would have been prosecuted dif-
ferently, or unappealed rejections might have been
pursued. For that reason, this Court has empha-
sized that “[f]undamental alterations in these rules
risk destroying the legitimate expectations of inven-
tors in their property” and that “courts must be cau-
tious before adopting changes that disrupt the set-
tled expectations of the inventing community.” Festo
Corp. v. Shoketsu Kinzoku Kogyo Kabushiki Co., 535
U.S. 722, 739 (2002); see also Warner-Jenkinson Co.
v. Hilton Davis Chem. Co., 520 U.S. 17, 32 (1997)
(“[W]e should be extremely reluctant to upset the ba-

10
sic assumptions of the PTO without substantial rea-
son for doing so.”).
II. THE FEDERAL CIRCUIT’S UNDULY NAR-
ROW TEST FOR PATENTABLE SUBJECT
MATTER IS INCONSISTENT WITH THIS
COURT’S PRECEDENTS.
The Federal Circuit correctly recognized that
“[t]he true issue” in this case is “whether [Bilski is]
seeking to claim a fundamental principle (such as an
abstract idea) or a mental process.” Pet. App. 8a.
Application of this Court’s decisions barring patents
that claim “laws of nature, natural phenomena, [or]
abstract ideas,” Diamond v. Diehr, 450 U.S. 175, 185
(1981), compels rejection of petitioners’ claim.
Rather than resting its holding on that ground,
however, the court of appeals engaged in an ex-
tended discussion of other potential limits on pat-
entability grounded in Section 101. It concluded that
this Court’s precedents required it to adopt the nar-
row machine-or-transformation test—even though
the court of appeals itself recognized that the test
may be inadequate to ensure that patent protection
is available for new and emerging technologies. Pet.
App. 17aThis is contrary to the basic purpose of the
Patent Act, which is to promote innovation.
By elevating the machine-or-transformation test
from a sufficient criterion for satisfying Section 101
into a necessary one, the Federal Circuit has unduly
narrowed the scope of patentability and threatened
future innovation. This Court has enunciated no
such “definitive test” and the Federal Circuit’s adop-
tion of the machine-or-transformation test as the ex-
clusive basis for satisfying Section 101 is not sup-
ported by this Court’s precedents. To the contrary,

11
this Court has emphasized the breadth of Section
101 and refused to recognize artificial limits on what
constitutes a “process,” mindful that technologies
evolve and that the patent system was designed to be
flexible and to accommodate new paths for innova-
tion.
This Court should reject the court of appeals’
narrow conception of patentable “process[es]” and re-
affirm its prior decisions emphasizing Section 101’s
role in preventing preemption of “laws of nature,
natural phenomena, and abstract ideas.” Diehr, 450
U.S. at 185.
Applying that standard, this Court
should nonetheless affirm the Federal Circuit’s re-
sult, because the disputed patent claim is an attempt
to patent a disembodied abstract idea.
A. This Court’s Holdings That Patents May
Not Encompass “Laws Of Nature, Natu-
ral Phenomena, And Abstract Ideas”
Dispose Of Petitioners’ Claim.
1. Section 101 defines patentability broadly
but precludes patents for scientific princi-
ples.
The scope of patentable subject matter is broad,
but it is far from unlimited. Section 101 permits the
protection of “any new and useful process, machine,
manufacture, or composition of matter.” However, as
this Court has long recognized, “[a]n idea of itself is
not patentable.” Rubber-Tip Pencil Co. v. Howard,
87 U.S. (20 Wall.) 498, 507 (1874). For that reason,
“[p]henomena of nature, though just discovered,
mental processes, and abstract intellectual concepts
are not patentable.” Gottschalk v. Benson, 409 U.S.
63, 67 (1972); accord Parker v. Flook, 437 U.S. 584,
589 (1978). Patent law does not extend to “the dis-

12
covery of some of the handiwork of nature,” Funk
Bros. Seed Co. v. Kalo Inoculant Co., 333 U.S. 127,
130 (1948), because laws of nature are “the basic
tools of scientific and technological work,” Benson,
409 U.S. at 67. Thus, no patent could claim Albert
Einstein’s equation for mass-energy equivalence,
mc2. Diamond v. Chakrabarty, 447 U.S. 303, 309
(1980).
The principle that ideas are not patentable, how-
ever, does not extend to “the application of [a] law of
nature to a new and useful end.” Funk Bros., 333
U.S. at 130; see also Mackay Radio & Tel. Co. v. Ra-
dio Corp. of Am., 306 U.S. 86, 94 (1939) (“While a
scientific truth, or the mathematical expression of it,
is not a patentable invention, a novel and useful
structure created with the aid of knowledge of scien-
tific truth may be.”). In drawing this critical distinc-
tion between abstract ideas and their applications,
this Court has looked to whether “the patent would
wholly pre-empt” the underlying idea, such that it
“in practical effect would be a patent on the [idea] it-
self.” Benson, 409 U.S. at 72; accord Diehr, 450 U.S.
at 187. Thus, the critical question is whether other
inventors may make use of the fundamental princi-
ple in their own specific applications thereof—or, in-
stead, whether the patent claims all such uses.
The non-preemption standard has long formed
the foundation of this Court’s Section 101 jurispru-
dence.3 In Tilghman v. Proctor, 102 U.S. 707 (1881),
the Court examined a patent claiming a novel
3 A similar non-preemption principle applies to copyrights.
Whereas an “idea” itself is not copyrightable, the particular ex-
pression of an idea is. Harper & Row Publishers, Inc. v. Nation
Enters., 471 U.S. 539, 556–557 (1985); see 17 U.S.C. § 102(b).

13
method for decomposing fats that applied the chemi-
cal principle that “the elements of neutral fat [are]
require[d] to be severally united with an atomic
equivalent of water in order to separate from each
other and become free.” Id. at 729. Tilghman’s
method involved heating a mixture of fat and water
in a vessel strong enough to resist the escape of
steam. This Court determined that this process con-
stituted patentable subject matter for two reasons:
Tilghman did not claim the chemical principle itself;
and the principle was not preempted, because his
claim did not cover the other known methods for em-
ploying the chemical fact—lime-saponification, sul-
phuric-acid distillation, and steam distillation. Ibid.
Conversely, in O’Reilly v. Morse, 56 U.S. (15
How.) 62 (1854), the Court examined Samuel Morse’s
eight claims relating to his electromagnetic telegraph
and concluded that the eighth claim was unpat-
entable. Morse explained that he sought to protect
not merely the specific application of direct current
that he employed in his telegraph, but any use of
electromagnetism for distance transmission “how-
ever developed.” Id. at 86. The Court rejected the
eighth claim because Morse had not—and could not
have—invented every possible implementation of
electromagnetism. Id. at 112–113. As the Federal
Circuit’s predecessor court has explained, “claim 8
was held improper because by disclaiming all appa-
ratus limitations, Morse was attempting to define
the limit of his invention in terms of the natural
phenomenon of electromagnetism and would, there-
fore, preempt the use of this phenomenon.” In re
Bergy, 596 F.2d 952, 990 (C.C.P.A. 1979), aff’d sub
nom. Diamond v. Chakrabarty, 447 U.S. 303 (1980).

14
Recently, in dissenting from the dismissal of cer-
tiorari in Laboratory Corp. of America Holdings v.
Metabolite Laboratories, Inc., 548 U.S. 124 (2006),
Justice Breyer (joined by Justices Stevens and
Souter) recognized that patents are unavailable for
laws of nature, natural phenomena, and abstract
ideas. Id. at 126–128. In expressing his view of the
merits of that case, Justice Breyer applied the non-
preemption test to determine that a process for de-
tecting vitamin deficiencies by measuring the level of
a correlated amino acid fell outside Section 101. See
id. at 137–138 (“[O]ne can reduce any process to a
series of steps. The question is what those steps em-
body. And here, aside from the unpatented test, they
embody only the correlation,” which is “an unpat-
entable ‘natural phenomenon.’ ”).
2. Preemption analysis can be used success-
fully to screen out non-patentable subject
matter.
Properly applied, the non-preemption standard is
an important means for determining whether an in-
ventor claims an abstract idea or an implementation
thereof—and therefore whether the subject matter is
patentable under Section 101. The Federal Circuit
and its predecessor court have employed this stan-
dard frequently to disqualify patent claims whose
preemptive effect would be equivalent to patenting a
natural law.
In In re Warmerdam, 33 F.3d 1354 (Fed. Cir.
1994), for example, the court reviewed an application
for a method to control the motion of objects to avoid
collision with other (fixed or moving) objects. It as-
sessed the interaction between Warmerdam’s claim 1
and the Hilditch Skeletonization method for creating
a bubble hierarchy on an object’s medial axis. See id.

15
at 1359–1360. After concluding that “the only prac-
tical[] embodiment of the claimed method” was a rep-
lication of the Hilditch Skeletonization method itself,
the court correctly determined that Warmerdam’s
claim 1 “describe[d] nothing more than the manipu-
lation of basic mathematical constructs, the para-
digmatic ‘abstract idea.’ ” Id. at 1360.
Similarly, in In re Schrader, 22 F.3d 290 (Fed.
Cir. 1994), the court rejected a claim for a supposedly
novel method for conducting auctions, because the
patent claimed “two obvious and familiar modes of
human behavior: that potential buyers naturally
may submit bids on one, some, or all of the items
available for sale, and that sellers may naturally
choose that combination of bids that maximize their
profits.” Id. at 293 n.8. Exclusive control over modes
of human behavior could not be awarded to an enter-
prising patent applicant.4
Consistent with this Court’s guidance in Benson,
the exclusion from Section 101’s scope of claims that
would preempt a law of nature, natural phenomenon,
or abstract idea imposes substantial and important
4 The court has reached the same conclusion with respect to
other claims. See In re Grams, 888 F.2d 835, 840 (Fed. Cir.
1989) (affirming denial of a patent for a method of testing a
complex system, because the only difference between the proc-
ess and the underlying scientific principle was the gathering of
data); In re Meyer, 688 F.2d 789, 796 (C.C.P.A. 1982) (affirming
denial of a patent for a process to identify locations of malfunc-
tion in a complex system, because the process was merely a
mathematical algorithm to be employed through mental steps);
In re Maucorps, 609 F.2d 481, 486 (C.C.P.A. 1979) (affirming
denial of a patent for a model sales organization, because the
“claimed invention as a whole comprises each and every means
for carrying out a solution technique for a set of equations
wherein one number is computed from a set of numbers”).

16
limits on the scope of patentability, guaranteeing
that the elemental tools of innovation will not be de-
nied public use.
3. The Bilski patent fails preemption analy-
sis.
Petitioners’ application was correctly denied as
an attempt to patent an abstract principle.
Claim 1 is directed toward:
A method for managing the consumption
risk costs of a commodity sold by a commod-
ity provider at a fixed price comprising the
steps of:
(a) initiating a series of transactions be-
tween said commodity provider and consum-
ers of said commodity wherein said consum-
ers purchase said commodity at a fixed rate
based upon historical averages, said fixed
rate corresponding to a risk position of said
consumers;
(b) identifying market participants for said
commodity having a counter-risk position to
said consumers, and
(c) initiating a series of transactions be-
tween said commodity provider and said
market participants at a second fixed rate
such that said series of market participant
transactions balances the risk position of
said series of consumer transactions.
JA 19–20.
Although Bilski developed this method with en-
ergy hedging in mind, Claim 1 does not require a
link to energy hedging and Bilski specifically dis-

17
claims any limitation on the embodiment of the in-
vention. See JA 19 (“[I]t is distinctly understood that
the invention is not limited [to the preferred em-
bodiments] * * *.”). Claim 1 does not specify a par-
ticular method for determining how to “identify[]”
persons or entities with a counter-risk position or
how to “balance[]” the risk position of the consumer
transaction; it seeks to cover any possible method
with these characteristics. See In re Morris, 127
F.3d 1048, 1055 (Fed. Cir. 1997).
Claim 1 therefore does not satisfy Section 101,
because it is a general claim on the concept of hedg-
ing and thus an attempt to patent an abstract idea.
Its vague steps preempt “every possible way of per-
forming the steps of the plan, by human or by any
kind of machine or by any combination thereof.” Pet.
App. 184a. As a result, “the claim is so broad that it
is directed to the ‘abstract idea’ itself, rather than a
practical implementation of the concept.” Ibid.
Claim 1 suffers from a defect similar to that of
Morse’s eighth claim—by trying to cover all possible
uses of an idea (including those the claimant has not
invented), the claim degenerates into a disembodied
concept without a particular application. The dis-
tinction between Bilski’s claim and a related claim
that might satisfy the non-preemption criterion par-
allels the distinction between Morse’s failed eighth
claim on telegraphy and Alexander Graham Bell’s
successful patent for telephony. As this Court ex-
plained in Benson, whereas Morse claimed an entire
field of science (electromagnetism), Bell claimed only
a particular method and not “all telephonic use of
electricity.” 409 U.S. at 68–69; compare Morse, 56
U.S. (15 How.) at 111–113, with The Telephone
Cases, 126 U.S. 1, 534–538 (1888). As far as Section

18
101 is concerned, Claim 1 here is indistinguishable
from Morse’s eighth claim.
B. This Court Has Rejected Artificial Lim-
its On What Constitutes A “Process.”
This Court has had several opportunities to ad-
dress the meaning of Section 101. On each occasion,
the Court has been mindful that technologies evolve
and that the patent system was designed to be flexi-
ble and to accommodate new paths for innovation.
Nonetheless, in affirming the rejection of the patent
application here, the Federal Circuit asserted that
this Court
has enunciated a definitive test to determine
whether a process claim is tailored narrowly
enough to encompass only a particular appli-
cation of a fundamental principle rather than
to pre-empt the principle itself. A claimed
process is surely patent-eligible under § 101
if: (1) it is tied to a particular machine or ap-
paratus, or (2) it transforms a particular ar-
ticle into a different state or thing.
Pet. App. 12a. This Court has never required such a
“definitive” test, and with good reason: such a test
would undermine the objectives of the patent system.
1. This Court has never required a “process”
to be tied to an apparatus or to be trans-
formative to be patentable.
The machine-or-transformation formulation orig-
inated in Cochrane v. Deener, 94 U.S. 780 (1877),
where this Court stated that Section 101’s reference
to “process” includes methods (a) that are tied to an
apparatus or (b) that, when “performed upon the
subject-matter,” result in its being “transformed and
reduced to a different state or thing.” Id. at 788.

19
Cochrane considered whether an improved process
for manufacturing flour constituted patentable sub-
ject matter. The applicant did not invent the ma-
chinery used in the individual steps of his process,
id. at 785–786, but instead invented a series of steps
that, when considered as a whole, “produced a revo-
lution in the manufacture of flour,” id. at 787. The
Court provided the two examples of a patentable
“process” only after emphasizing that “it cannot be
disputed” that the patentability of a process does not
depend on “the particular form of the instrumentali-
ties used.” Id. at 787–788.
Consistent with that observation, this Court has
never held that Cochrane’s two examples—machine-
based and transformative methods—were intended
to be exhaustive. Nonetheless, the Federal Circuit
held that the machine-or-transformation standard is
“the sole test governing § 101 analyses,” Pet. App.
15a, relying upon this Court’s decisions in Benson,
Flook, and Diehrid. at 12a–15a. None of those
cases supports the Federal Circuit’s conclusion.
To the contrary, in both Benson and Flook, the
Court was careful to point out that the Cochrane
categories were not intended to be exhaustive. See
Benson, 409 U.S. at 71 (“[w]e do not hold that no
process patent could ever qualify” if it was not “tied
to a particular machine or apparatus” and did not
“operate to change articles or materials to a ‘different
state or thing’ ”); Flook, 437 U.S. at 588 n.9 (“we as-
sume that a valid process patent may issue even if it
does not meet one of these qualifications”). Diehr
concluded that the machine-or-transformation stan-
dard was satisfied, quoting Benson; there was thus
no occasion to discuss the breadth of the definition of
“process” in Section 101. Nothing in Diehr suggests

20
that the Court was abandoning what it made clear in
Benson and Flook.
2. The statutory term “process” should be in-
terpreted broadly.
In contrast to the Federal Circuit, which nar-
rowed Section 101, this Court has emphasized that
“the language of § 101 is extremely broad” and that
“Congress plainly contemplated that [it] would be
given wide scope.” J.E.M. Ag Supply, Inc. v. Pioneer
Hi-Bred Int’l, Inc., 534 U.S. 124, 130 (2001) (quoting
Chakrabarty, 447 U.S. at 308). Beyond the historical
limitations just discussed (the exclusion of laws of
nature, natural phenomena, and abstract ideas), this
Court has “more than once cautioned” that courts
“should not read into the patent laws limitations and
conditions which the legislature has not expressed.”
Diehr, 450 U.S. at 182 (quoting Chakrabarty, 447
U.S. at 308, in turn quoting United States v. Dubilier
Condenser Corp., 289 U.S. 178, 199 (1933)). Apply-
ing that principle, the Court has held that “anything
under the sun that is made by man” presumptively
constitutes patentable subject matter under Section
101. Diehr, 450 U.S. at 182 (quoting S. REP. NO. 82-
1979, at 5 (1952), and H.R. REP. NO. 82-1923, at 6
(1952)); accord Bonito Boats, Inc. v. Thunder Craft
Boats, Inc., 489 U.S. 141, 154 (1989); Chakrabarty,
447 U.S. at 308.
In interpreting “process,” the Court has applied
the general principle that an undefined statutory
term should be given its “ordinary, contemporary,
common meaning.” Diehr, 450 U.S. at 182. The or-
dinary meaning of “process” is broad: “an artificial or
voluntary progressively continuing operation that
consists of a series of controlled actions or move-
ments systematically directed toward a particular

21
result or end.” WEBSTER’S NEW INTERNATIONAL DIC-
TIONARY 1808 (3d ed. 1986); see also WEBSTER’S NEW
INTERNATIONAL DICTIONARY 1972 (2d ed. 1950) (“A
series of actions, motions, or operations definitely
conducing to an end, whether voluntary or involun-
tary.”). Giving the term its broad, ordinary meaning
leaves the door open to the granting of patents with
respect to new technologies. A construction that is
not technology-neutral would threaten to arbitrarily
short-circuit entire fields of development.
When Congress wishes to exclude a particular
subject matter from the patent laws, it knows how to
do so. For example, Congress has instructed the
PTO to issue no patents for inventions “useful solely
in the utilization of special nuclear material or
atomic energy in an atomic weapon.”
42 U.S.C.
§ 2181(a); cf. 17 U.S.C. § 102(b) (exclusions from
copyrightable subject matter).
But Congress has
made no similar exception for certain types of proc-
esses, and the courts are not free to introduce a new
exception in its stead.
Reinterpreting Section 101 to impose restrictions
on the scope of patentable processes not found in the
statutory text also would be inconsistent with this
Court’s decision in KSR International Co. v. Teleflex
Inc., 550 U.S. 398 (2007). There, in assessing the
evaluation of nonobviousness under Section 103, the
Court rejected replacement of the “expansive and
flexible approach” mandated by the statute with a
“rigid approach” that added criteria not found in the
text. Id. at 415. So too here, the Federal Circuit
erred by inserting into Section 101 restrictions not
found in the statutory text.
Finally, this Court has made clear that “process”
claims must be “considered as a whole.” Diehr, 450

22
U.S. at 188. Thus, “a new combination of steps in a
process may be patentable even though all the con-
stituents of the combination were well known and in
common use before the combination was made.”
Ibid.
By refusing to compartmentalize process
claims, the Court has provided further confirmation
that Section 101 should not be construed to embody
restrictive standards not reflected in the statutory
text and that the “process” standard should be ap-
plied in light of all the facts and circumstances in a
particular case.
C. The Federal Circuit’s Narrow Standard
Creates Needless Uncertainty About
Patentable Subject Matter.
The Federal Circuit’s machine-or-transformation
standard for patentable subject matter is not only in-
consistent with this Court’s precedents; it will also
lead to needless confusion about what constitutes
patentable subject matter as technology evolves. The
Federal Circuit in effect acknowledged as much,
when it said that “future developments in technology
or the sciences may present difficult challenges to
the machine-or-transformation test,” such that “the
Supreme Court may ultimately decide to alter or
perhaps even set aside this test to accommodate
emerging technologies.” Pet. App. 17a.
It is unwise in any circumstance to adopt a test
that is acknowledged to be under-inclusive. These
concerns are even greater in the context of the patent
system, which is designed to be forward-looking and
to promote the development of new fields of innova-
tion. As Judge Rader aptly put it, the Federal Cir-
cuit’s test “links patent eligibility to the age of iron

23
and steel at a time of subatomic particles and tera-
bytes.” Pet. App. 134a (dissenting opinion).5
In the modern age, the Federal Circuit’s test ap-
parently contemplates that innovators will pursue
new avenues even if they may not satisfy the ma-
chine-or-transformation test, somehow expecting
that their cause will lead the Federal Circuit or this
Court to craft a new standard. That is not a reason-
able expectation. “Uncertainty is the enemy of inno-
vation,” Pet. App. 61a (Newman, J., dissenting), and
an under-inclusive test will have an obvious chilling
effect. To avoid this counterproductive outcome—
which is compelled neither by the text of Section 101
nor by this Court’s precedent—the standard for Sec-
tion 101 must be sufficiently flexible to account for
new fields of innovation.
Software provides a case study for the predica-
ment that arises from the Federal Circuit’s test.
From a technical perspective, “software” is typically
a series of commands that reside on a storage me-
dium and are performed on a general purpose com-
puter to accomplish a desired task. The physical
counterpart of software is “hardware.” Virtually any
task that is performed by programming a general
purpose computer with software could also be
achieved by hard-coding those same instructions into
a hardware device. To advance innovation, it would
5 Even during the age of iron, the machine-or-transformation
test was understood to present a sufficient—but not neces-
sary—criterion for patentable subject matter. The Cochrane
formulation was designed “not to limit process patentability but
to point out that a process is not limited to the means used in
performing it.”
In re Prater, 415 F.2d 1378, 1387–1388
(C.C.P.A. 1968), aff’d in part and rev’d in part on reh’g, 415 F.2d
1393 (C.C.P.A. 1969).

24
make little sense to differentiate between tasks per-
formed by hardware and those performed by soft-
ware. Recognizing this, the Federal Circuit has held
that “[computer] programming creates a new ma-
chine, because a general purpose computer in effect
becomes a special purpose computer once it is pro-
grammed to perform particular functions pursuant to
instructions from program software.” In re Alappat,
33 F.3d 1526, 1545 (Fed. Cir. 1994) (en banc).
Accordingly, even under the court of appeals’ re-
strictive machine-or-transformation test, software-
implemented inventions are patentable subject mat-
ter—so long as they do not preempt a law of nature,
a natural phenomenon, or an abstract idea. Not-
withstanding this framework, the Bilski decision has
resulted in an increased level of uncertainty within
the Board of Patent Appeals and Interferences.
Some panels have concluded that Bilski requires the
rejection of methods that “could be implemented on a
software system.”
Ex parte Motoyama, 2009 WL
524946, at *5 (B.P.A.I. Feb. 27, 2009); Ex parte
Scholl, 2009 WL 288204, at *7 (B.P.A.I. Feb. 4,
2009). Another panel has concluded that software, to
be patentable, requires a “structural tie to an article
of manufacture, machine, process or composition of
matter.” Ex parte Petculescu, 2009 WL 1718896, at
*8 (B.P.A.I. June 4, 2009). Although these decisions
fail to comport with established precedent, see, e.g.,
Eolas Techs., Inc. v. Microsoft Corp., 399 F.3d 1325,
1339 (Fed. Cir. 2005) (“Without question, software
code alone qualifies as an invention eligible for pat-
enting under these categories, at least as proc-
esses.”), they underscore the need for this Court to
develop an appropriately flexible standard for Sec-
tion 101 compliance and to reaffirm that software-
implemented inventions are eligible for patent pro-

25
tection. They also underscore the need for clarity in
this Court’s opinion.
Although the Federal Circuit sought to provide
clarity through the opinion below, the early response
from the Patent Office suggests that, not only was
the decision based on faulty reasoning, but confusion
reigns. Accordingly, even if the Court decides to af-
firm the Federal Circuit’s adoption of the machine-
or-transformation test, it is critical that the Court
make clear that software-implemented inventions
are protected by that framework.
Further difficulty arises in contemplating future
developments in software and other fields. Just as
there is neither a statutory basis nor a practical rea-
son to award patents to hard-wired appliances but
not to software-programmed general computers that
perform the same process, there is no reason to dis-
tinguish between software that runs on personal
computers and software that operates on the Inter-
net. But at least one district court has concluded
that Bilski mandates such a distinction. See Cyber-
Source Corp. v. Retail Decisions, Inc., 620 F. Supp.
2d 1068 (N.D. Cal. 2009).
Dissenters on the Federal Circuit recognized the
limitations of the majority’s standard. Already, in-
ventions that employ “today’s electronic and photonic
technology” may be excluded by the machine-or-
transformation limitation, even though they “con-
tribute to the vigor and variety of today’s Informa-
tion Age” in the manner that the Patent Act is de-
signed to promote. Pet. App. 60a (Newman, J., dis-
senting). As new fields of innovation develop, those
limitations will become even more pronounced and
even more damaging to innovation.

26
D. The Proper Standard Should Acknowl-
edge The Role Of Section 101 Pat-
entability As A Threshold Determina-
tion.
This Court’s precedent establishes that mere
ideas are not patentable but that methods satisfying
Cochrane are. The remaining question is how to as-
sess the Section 101 eligibility of methods that nei-
ther claim an abstract idea, as determined by the
non-preemption test, nor are encompassed by the
Cochrane categories.
For this task, the ordinary
tools of statutory construction are all that is re-
quired. The appropriate standard should reflect the
text of the patent laws and carry out their underly-
ing policy: that inventors should be rewarded for con-
tributions to knowledge but not for those basic scien-
tific principles over which no person should be al-
lowed exclusive rights.
Toward this end, Section 101 acts as an impor-
tant—if only partial—restraint.
Section 101 pre-
cludes patent protection for abstract principles or
natural laws—or their equivalents—that claim too
much and would impede technological advancement
if they could be controlled by one person. But Sec-
tion 101 is not the sole filter. Read in context, its
purpose must be to set a threshold requirement for
patentability that, while meaningful, does not bear
the full burden of ensuring that only meritorious in-
ventions receive the benefits of a patent. That bur-
den is shared by Sections 102, 103, and 112, which
impose additional requirements of novelty, nonobvi-
ousness, and enablement.
The threshold set by Section 101 must not be
rigid, lest it fail to recognize the dynamic nature of
scientific progress and inventorship. As this Court

27
has previously mentioned, the Patent Act was de-
signed to reach “anything under the sun that is made
by man.” Chakrabarty, 447 U.S. at 308. In this
spirit, the Court should adopt a standard that pre-
vents patents on the building blocks of innovation—
principally through the non-preemption doctrine—
while staying true to the broad ordinary meaning of
“process.” This can be achieved by continuing to em-
ploy the preemption analysis. The cost of an under-
inclusive test is serious, because inventions not pur-
sued cannot be quantified.
The cost of an over-
inclusive approach is decidedly less pronounced, be-
cause borderline claims still will be required to sat-
isfy the other stringent criteria for patentability.
Consistent with this Court’s teachings, therefore, the
standard under Section 101 should err on the side of
finding processes to be patentable subject matter.
CONCLUSION
The judgment of the court of appeals should be
affirmed.
Respectfully submitted.
ANDREW J. PINCUS
Counsel of Record
DAN HIMMELFARB
BRIAN D. NETTER
Mayer Brown LLP
1909 K Street, NW
Washington, DC 20006
(202) 263-3000
Counsel for Amicus Curiae
Business Software Alliance
AUGUST 2009