No. 08-964 
IN THE 
Supreme Court of the United States 
———— 
BERNARD L. BILSKI AND RAND A. WARSAW, 
Petitioners, 
v. 
JOHN J. DOLL, ACTING UNDER SECRETARY OF 
COMMERCE FOR INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND ACTING 
DIRECTOR OF THE UNITED STATES PATENT AND 
TRADEMARK OFFICE, 
Respondent
———— 
On Writ of Certiorari to the 
United States Court of Appeals  
for the Federal Circuit 
———— 
BRIEF FOR PETITIONERS 
———— 
 
J. MICHAEL JAKES 
Counsel of Record 
ERIKA H. ARNER 
FINNEGAN, HENDERSON,  
FARABOW, GARRETT & 
DUNNER, L.L.P. 
901 New York Avenue, N.W. 
Washington, D.C.  20001 
 
(202) 408-4000 
RONALD E. MYRICK 
DENISE W. DEFRANCO 
FINNEGAN, HENDERSON, 
FARABOW, GARRETT &  
DUNNER, L.L.P. 
55 Cambridge Parkway 
Cambridge, MA  02142 
(617) 452-1600 
 
WILSON-EPES PRINTING CO., INC.   –   (202) 789-0096   –   WASHINGTON, D. C. 20002 

QUESTIONS PRESENTED 
1.  Whether the Federal Circuit erred by holding 
that a “process” must be tied to a particular machine 
or apparatus, or transform a particular article into a 
different state or thing (“machine-or-transformation” 
test), to be eligible for patenting under 35 U.S.C. 
§ 101, despite this Court’s precedent declining to 
limit the broad statutory grant of patent eligibility 
for  “any”  new and useful process beyond excluding 
patents for “laws of nature, physical phenomena, and 
abstract ideas.” 
2.  Whether the “machine-or-transformation”  test 
for patent eligibility adopted by the Federal Circuit, 
effectively foreclosing meaningful patent protection 
to a business method involving a series of transac-
tions among a commodity provider, consumers, and 
market participants, contradicts the clear Congres-
sional intent that patents protect “method[s] of doing 
or conducting business.” 35 U.S.C. § 273. 
(i) 

ii 
PARTIES TO THE PROCEEDING 
All of the parties to the proceeding in the court below 
are named in the caption of the case in this Court. 
RULE 29.6 CORPORATE 
DISCLOSURE STATEMENT 
The amended corporate disclosure  statement in 
Petitioners’  reply brief on the petition for a writ of 
certiorari remains accurate.  In addition, Petitioners 
note that WeatherWise USA, Inc., is a party-in-inter-
est in the patent application. 
 

 
TABLE OF CONTENTS 
Page 
QUESTIONS PRESENTED......................................... i 
PARTIES TO THE PROCEEDING ............................ ii 
RULE 29.6 CORPORATE DISCLOSURE 
STATEMENT ........................................................... ii 
TABLE OF AUTHORITIES ...................................... vii 
OPINIONS BELOW .....................................................1 
JURISDICTION ...........................................................2 
STATUTORY PROVISIONS INVOLVED ...................2 
STATEMENT OF THE CASE .....................................3 
A.  The Claimed Invention ........................................3 
B.  Proceedings  In The Patent  And  Trade-
mark Office ..........................................................9 
C.  The Federal Circuit’s En Banc Decision ........... 11 
SUMMARY OF THE ARGUMENT ........................... 14 
ARGUMENT ............................................................... 18 
I.  THE FEDERAL CIRCUIT’S MANDA-
TORY  “MACHINE-OR-TRANSFORMA-
TION”  TEST HAS NO BASIS IN  THE 
PATENT STATUTE AND CONFLICTS 
WITH THIS COURT’S PRECEDENTS .......... 18 
A.  The Plain Language Of The Statute 
Is  Extremely Broad, As This Court 
Has Repeatedly Held ................................ 18 
B.  The Federal Circuit’s Mandatory 
“Machine-Or-Transformation”  Test 
Conflicts With This Court’s Prece-
dents .......................................................... 20 
(iii) 

iv 
TABLE OF CONTENTS—Continued 
Page 
1.  The Federal Circuit Erred By 
Adopting An Exclusion To Patent-
able Subject Matter That This 
Court Has Twice Rejected ...................... 20 
2.  The Federal Circuit Erred By Sub-
jecting Processes To Additional 
Conditions For Patent Eligibility ........... 22 
3.  The Particulars Of The Machine-
Or-Transformation Test Compound 
The Errors In The Decision Below ......... 23 
4.  The Federal Circuit’s Rigid Test 
For Patentable Subject Matter Re-
pudiates This Court’s Broad, 
Flexible Interpretation of § 101 .............. 27 
II.  SECTION 101 MUST BE READ 
BROADLY ENOUGH TO PROTECT 
“METHOD[S] OF DOING OR CON-
DUCTING BUSINESS”  IN LIGHT OF 
35 U.S.C. § 273 ................................................. 29 
A.  The  Patent  Act Expressly Provides 
For Patents On Business Methods .......... 29 
B.  The Machine-Or-Transformation Test 
For  § 101 Disrupts The Balance 
Struck By Congress When Enacting 
§ 273 .......................................................... 30 
C.  J.E.M. Ag Supply Illustrates The 
Proper Way To Harmonize § 101 
With Other Parts Of The Patent Act ....... 34 
 
 


TABLE OF CONTENTS—Continued 
Page 
III.  THE FEDERAL CIRCUIT’S DECISION 
IMPROPERLY LEGISLATES NEW 
PUBLIC POLICY AND DISRUPTS 
THE SETTLED EXPECTATIONS OF 
PATENT OWNERS AND INVENTORS ......... 37 
IV.  THIS COURT SHOULD REAFFIRM 
THE  “PRACTICAL APPLICATION” 
RULE FOR INVENTIONS INVOLVING 
FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES .................... 42 
A.  This Court Has Applied Its “Practical 
Application”  Standard Consistently 
With The Language Of § 101 ................... 43 
B.  Nonmanufacturing Processes Have 
Historically Been Eligible For Pa-
tenting Under The Statute ....................... 47 
V.  THE FEDERAL CIRCUIT’S DECISION 
SHOULD BE REVERSED BECAUSE 
THE BILSKI APPLICATION CLAIMS 
PATENTABLE SUBJECT MATTER .............. 52 
A.  Before  The  PTO  And  Federal  Cir-
cuit Started Applying The Machine-
Or-Transformation Test, Bilski’s 
Claims  Passed The Threshold Of 
§ 101 .......................................................... 52 
B.  The Claimed Hedging Method Falls 
Within One Of The Enumerated 
Categories Of § 101 ................................... 55 
C.  Claim 1 Does Not Fall Within One 
Of This Court’s Exceptions To 
Patent-Eligible Subject Matter ................ 57 
 

vi 
TABLE OF CONTENTS—Continued 
Page 
D.  Claim 4 Recites A Practical Applica-
tion Of A Mathematical Equation ............ 58 
CONCLUSION ........................................................... 60 
 
 
 

vii 
TABLE OF AUTHORITIES 
CASES  
Page(s) 
In re Alappat, 33 F.3d 1526 (Fed. Cir. 
1994) (en banc) ..................................... 12, 37, 53 
AT&T Corp. v. Excel Commc’ns, Inc.,  172 
F.3d 1352 (Fed. Cir. 1999) ................... 12, 54, 55 
Cochrane v. Deener, 94 U.S. 780 (1877) .............. 23 
In re Comiskey,  554 F.3d 967  (Fed. Cir. 
2009) ................................................................. 55 
Corning v. Burden, 15 How. (56 U.S.) 252 
(1854) .......................................................... 23, 24 
CyberSource Corp. v. Retail Decisions, Inc.
2009 WL 815448 (N.D. Cal. Mar. 27, 
2009) ........................................................... 33, 34 
Davis v. Mich. Dept. of Treasury, 489 U.S. 
803 (1989) ......................................................... 29 
Diamond v. Chakrabarty, 447 U.S. 303 
(1980) ........................................................ passim 
Diamond v. Diehr, 450 U.S. 175 (1981) ...... passim 
eBay Inc. v. MercExchange, LLC, 547 U.S. 
388 (2006) ............................................. 27, 28, 41 
Expanded Metal Co. v. Bradford, 214 U.S. 
366 (1909) ................................................... 24, 38 
Festo Corp. v. Shoketsu Kinzoku Kogyo 
Kabushiki Co., 535 U.S. 722 (2002) .... 27, 39, 40 
FTC v. Mandel Bros., Inc., 359 U.S. 385 
(1959) ................................................................ 29 
Funk Bros. Seed Co. v. Kalo Inoculant Co.
333 U.S. 127 (1948) ........................ 23, 43, 45, 59 
Garcia v. United States, 469 U.S. 70 (1984) ....... 56 
Gottschalk v. Benson, 409 U.S. 63 (1972) ... passim 
Hartranft v. Wiegmann, 121 U.S. 609 
(1887) ................................................................ 46 
J.E.M. Ag Supply, Inc. v. Pioneer Hi-Bred 
Int’l, Inc., 534 U.S. 124 (2001) ................. passim 
 

viii 
TABLE OF AUTHORITIES—Continued 
 
Page(s) 
KSR Int’l Co. v. Teleflex Inc., 550 U.S. 398 
(2007) .......................................................... 28, 41 
Le  Roy v. Tatham,  14 How. (55 U.S.)  156 
(1853) .......................................................... 20, 42 
Ex parte Lundgren, 2004 WL 3561262 
(B.P.A.I. April 20, 2004) ............................ 10, 36 
Mackay Radio & Tel. Co. v. Radio Corp. of 
Am., 306 U.S. 86 (1939) ....................... 43, 46, 58 
New Process Fermentation Co. v. Maus
122 U.S. 413 (1887) ........................ 23, 24, 43, 45 
O’Reilley v. Morse,  15 How. (56 U.S.)  62 
(1854) ........................................................ passim 
Parker v. Flook, 437 U.S. 584 (1978) .......... passim 
Perrin v. United States, 444 U.S. 37 (1979).. 18, 19 
State Street Bank & Trust Co. v. Signature 
Fin.  Group, Inc.,  149 F.3d 1368 (Fed. 
Cir. 1998) .................................................. passim 
State Street Bank & Trust Co. v. Signature 
Fin. Group, Inc., 525 U.S. 1093 (1999) ........... 30 
Tilghman v. Proctor, 102 U.S. 707 (1881) .. passim 
The Telephone Cases, 126 U.S. 1 (1887)  .... passim 
United States v. Dubilier Condenser Corp., 
289 U.S. 178 (1933) .......................................... 19 
Warner-Jenkinson Co. v. Hilton Davis 
Chem. Co., 520 U.S. 17 (1997) ................... 39, 40 
CONSTITUTIONAL PROVISIONS 
U.S. CONST. art. I, § 8, cl. 8 ................................. 48 
STATUTES 
Patent Act of 1790, § 1, 1 Stat. 109 .................... 51 
Patent Act of 1793, § 1, 1 Stat. 318 .................... 51 
28 U.S.C. § 1254(1) ................................................2 
 

ix 
TABLE OF AUTHORITIES—Continued 
 
Page(s) 
28 U.S.C. § 1295(a)(4)(A) ..................................... 11 
35 U.S.C. § 6(b) ......................................................9 
35 U.S.C. § 100(b) ................................ 2, 18, 55, 56 
35 U.S.C. § 101 ............................................ passim 
35 U.S.C. § 102 .................................................... 41 
35 U.S.C. § 103 .............................................. 28, 41 
35 U.S.C. § 112 .............................................. 41, 42 
35 U.S.C. § 119 .................................................... 35 
35 U.S.C. § 134(a) ..................................................9 
35 U.S.C. § 141 .................................................... 11 
35 U.S.C. § 273 ............................................ passim 
35 U.S.C. § 273(a)(1)............................................ 29 
35 U.S.C. § 273(a)(3)........................................ 2, 29 
35 U.S.C. § 273(b) ................................................ 29 
35 U.S.C. § 273(b)(1)..............................................2 
LEGISLATIVE HISTORY 
145 CONG. REC. 29272 (1999) ........................ 31, 32 
145 CONG. REC. 30634 (1999) ........................ 31, 32 
145 CONG. REC. 30703 (1999) ........................ 31, 32 
145 CONG. REC. 31007 (1999) ........................ 32, 33 
H.R. REP. NO. 82-1923 (1952) .............................. 19 
H.R. REP. NO. 106-287, pt. 1 (1999) .............. 32, 33 
H.R. REP. NO. 106-464 (1999) ........................ 30, 31 
H.R. 1332, 107th Cong. (2001) ............................ 36 
H.R. 5299, 108th Cong. (2004) ............................ 36 
H.R. 5364, 106th Cong. (2000) ............................ 36 
S. REP NO. 82-1979 (1952), as reprinted in 
1952 U.S.C.C.A.N. 2394, 2399......................... 19 
OTHER AUTHORITIES 
THE FEDERALIST NO. 43 (James Madison) .......... 49 
P.J. Federico, The First Patent Act, 14 J. 
PAT. OFF. SOC’Y 237 (1932) ........................ 50, 51 
 


TABLE OF AUTHORITIES—Continued 
 
Page(s) 
Karl Fenning, The  Origin of the Patent 
and Copyright Clause of the Constitu-
tion, 11 J. PAT. OFF. SOC’Y 438 (1929) ....... 48, 49 
Examination Guidelines for Computer 
Related Inventions, 61 Fed. Reg. 7478 
(Feb. 28, 1996) ............................................ 30, 35 
E. Wyndham Hulme,  The History of the 
Patent System Under the Prerogative 
and at Common Law, 12 L. Q. REV. 141, 
144 (1896) ......................................................... 48 
Interim Guidelines for Examination of 
Patent Applications for Patent Subject 
Matter Eligibility, 1300 OFFICIAL GAZETTE 
U.S.  PAT.  &  TRADEMARK  OFF., Nov. 22, 
2005, at 142 .......................................... 10, 35, 36 
Ramon A. Klitzke, Historical Background 
of the English Patent Law, 41 J.  PAT. 
OFF. SOC’Y, Sept. 1959, at 615. .................. 47, 48 
Karl B. Lutz, Patents and Science:  A 
Clarification of the Patent Clause of the 
U.S. Constitution,  18  GEO.  WASH.  L. 
REV. 50 (1949) .................................................. 49 
D.F. Renn, John Knox’s Plan for Insuring 
Lives: A Patent of Invention in 1778, 101 
J. INST. ACTUARIES 285 (1974) ......................... 48 
Edward C. Walterscheid, THE  NATURE OF 
THE  INTELLECTUAL  PROPERTY  CLAUSE:  A 
STUDY IN HISTORICAL  PERSPECTIVE 
(1961) ................................................................ 48 
Letter to Benjamin Vaughan (June 1790), 
8 WRITINGS OF THOMAS JEFFERSON, at 50 
(Andrew A. Lipscomb et al. eds., 1903) ........... 50 
 
 

xi 
TABLE OF AUTHORITIES—Continued 
 
Page(s) 
Letter to Oliver Evans (May 1807), 5 
WRITINGS OF THOMAS  JEFFERSON, at 75 
(Washington ed.) ........................................ 49, 50 
U.S. Patent No. 5,862,223  (filed July 24, 
1996) ................................................................. 40 
U.S. Patent No. 6,014,643 (filed Aug. 26, 
1996) ................................................................. 41 
U.S. Patent No. 6,119,099 (filed Aug. 26, 
1997) ................................................................. 40 
 

IN THE 
Supreme Court of the United States 
———— 
No. 08-964 
———— 
BERNARD L. BILSKI AND RAND A. WARSAW, 
Petitioners, 
v. 
JOHN J. DOLL, ACTING UNDER SECRETARY OF 
COMMERCE FOR INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND ACTING 
DIRECTOR OF THE UNITED STATES PATENT AND 
TRADEMARK OFFICE, 
Respondent
———— 
On Writ of Certiorari to the 
United States Court of Appeals  
for the Federal Circuit 
———— 
BRIEF FOR PETITIONERS 
———— 
OPINIONS BELOW 
The opinion of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 
Federal Circuit (Pet. App. 1a-143a) is reported at In 
re Bilski, 545 F.3d 943 (Fed. Cir. 2008) (en banc).  
The Order of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fed-
eral Circuit granting a hearing en banc (Pet. App. 
144a-145a) is reported at In re Bilski, 264 F. App’x 
896 (Fed. Cir. 2008). 


The opinion of the Board of Patent Appeals and 
Interferences of the United States Patent and Trade-
mark Office (Pet. App. 146a-205a) is reported at Ex 
parte Bilski, 2006 WL 5738364 (B.P.A.I. Sept. 26, 
2006). 
JURISDICTION 
The en banc judgment of the U.S. Court of Appeals 
for the Federal Circuit was entered on October 30, 
2008.  The jurisdiction of this Court is invoked under 
28 U.S.C. § 1254(1). 
STATUTORY PROVISIONS INVOLVED 
“Whoever invents or discovers any new and useful 
process, machine, manufacture, or composition of 
matter, or any new and useful improvement thereof, 
may obtain a patent therefor, subject to the condi-
tions and requirements of this title.”  35 U.S.C. § 101. 
“The term ‘process’  means process, art  or method, 
and includes a new use of a known process, machine, 
manufacture, composition of matter, or material.”  35 
U.S.C. § 100(b). 
“It shall be a defense to an action for infringement 
under  section 271 of this title with respect to any 
subject matter that would otherwise infringe one or 
more claims for a method in the patent being as-
serted against a person, if such person had, acting in 
good faith, actually reduced the subject matter to 
practice at least 1 year before the effective filing date 
of such patent, and commercially used the subject 
matter before the effective filing date of such patent.”  
35 U.S.C. § 273(b)(1). 
“[T]he term ‘method’  means a method of doing or 
conducting business.”  35 U.S.C. § 273(a)(3). 


STATEMENT OF THE CASE 
A.  The Claimed Invention 
Bernard Bilski and Rand Warsaw invented a me-
thod of hedging the consumption risk associated with 
a commodity sold at a fixed price for a given period.  
The method can be used, for example, with energy 
commodities like natural gas, electricity, or coal, and 
includes ways to compensate for the risk of abnormal 
weather conditions.  It enables both energy suppliers 
and consumers to minimize the risk of fluctuations in 
demand during a given period.  Thus, for example, a 
school district with a fixed tax base and budget for 
heating or cooling requirements can be protected 
from yearly fluctuations in weather, while the suppli-
ers are protected from the opposite effect of such 
fluctuations. 
More specifically, the Bilski patent application, 
entitled  “Energy Risk Management Method,”  de-
scribes a method in which energy consumers, such as 
businesses and homeowners, are offered a fixed 
energy bill, for example, for the winter so they can 
avoid the risk of high heating bills due to abnormally 
cold weather.  J.A. 10, 13.  An intermediary or “com-
modity provider” sells natural gas, in this example, to 
a consumer at a fixed price based on its risk position 
for a given period of time, thus isolating the con-
sumer from an unusual spike in demand caused by a 
cold winter.  Regardless of how much gas the con-
sumer uses consistent with the method, the heating 
bill will remain fixed. 
According to the patent application, setting the 
fixed bill price for the consumer is not a simple 
process.  See id. at 12-14.  For example, a consumer’s 


“unhedged”  energy bill for a given period can be 
expressed as follows: 
Energy Bill = F  + (C  + T  + LD ) x Q , where 
i
i
i
i
i
F  = fixed costs in period i; 
i
C  = variable commodity costs in period i; 
i
T   = variable long distance transportation costs 
i
in period i; 
LD   = variable LDC or local delivery costs in 
i
period i; and 
Q  = consumption in period i. 
i
J.A. 12.  The consumer could fix a portion of the costs 
by using futures, for example, to lock in a price on the 
portion of consumption that is known with certainty.  
This type of “hedge” is not effective, however, to the 
extent that consumption is driven by the weather.  
Id. at 13.  Thus, a school district, for example, cannot 
reduce its risk simply by locking in a price since 
much of the risk depends on the weather.  Id.  
To account for the weather, the patent application 
teaches that a consumer’s fixed bill price can be 
determined as follows: 
Fixed Bill Price = F  + [(C  + T  + LD ) x (α + βE 
i
i
i
i
(W ))] 
l
In this equation, α  +  βE (W ) represents an approx-
l
imation of the amount of consumption driven by the 
weather, which is estimated with a least squares 
statistical model based on historical averages.  See id. 
at 13-14. 
Having assumed the risk of a very cold winter, the 
same commodity provider hedges against that risk by 
buying the energy commodity at a second fixed price 


from energy suppliers called “market participants.”  
Id.  at 12.  These market participants or suppliers 
have a risk position counter to the consumers, that is, 
they want to avoid the risk of a high drop in demand 
due to an unusually warm winter.  A market par-
ticipant could be, for example, someone with a large 
inventory of gas who wants to guarantee the sale of a 
portion of it by entering into a contract now.  The risk 
assumed in the transactions with the market partici-
pants at the second fixed rate balances the risk of the 
consumer transactions at the first rate.  Id. at 12, 15. 
The commodity provider must take additional sta-
tistical modeling steps (Monte Carlo simulations, 
one-tail tests) to properly price a deal and estimate 
an acceptable margin over the entire portfolio of 
transactions.  Id. at 16.  The steps taken in pricing a 
deal, and in managing the portfolio, are shown in 
Figure 21 of the application and described at J.A. 16-
19: 
 
 
 
 
 
                                            
1 The application as filed (found at J.A. 10-23) did not include 
Figure 2, which was added by amendment (Applicants’ Supple-
mental Amendment, 11/15/99) in response to the patent ex-
aminer’s requirement to provide a drawing under 37 C.F.R. 
§ 1.81 (PTO Office Action, 11/8/99, p. 2). 


 


The method of the invention does not necessarily 
have to be performed on a particular machine or 
computer, although the practice of the invention will 
most likely involve both computers and modern tele-
communications.  The method steps are no less real, 
however, as they require communicating and nego-
tiating with consumers and suppliers in a particular 
way to balance risk positions.  The invention is 
claimed in a series of steps as follows: 
1.  A method for managing the consumption risk 
costs of a commodity sold by a commodity pro-
vider at a fixed price comprising the steps of: 
(a)  initiating a series of transactions between 
said commodity provider and consumers of said 
commodity wherein said consumers purchase said 
commodity at a fixed rate based upon historical 
averages, said fixed rate corresponding to a risk 
position of said consumer; 
(b)  identifying market participants for said com-
modity having a counter-risk position to said 
consumers; and 
(c)  initiating a series of transactions between 
said commodity provider and said market partici-
pants at a second fixed rate such that said series 
of market participant transactions balances the 
risk position of said series of consumer transac-
tions. 
Fed. Cir. J.A. A-198.  Claim 4 of the patent applica-
tion is similar to claim 1 except that it specifies 
precisely how the fixed price for an energy consumer 
transaction is determined using a  mathematical 
formula: 


4.  A method for managing weather-related ener-
gy price risk costs sold by an energy provider at a 
fixed price comprising the steps of: 
(a)  initiating  a series of transactions between 
said energy provider and energy consumers 
wherein said energy consumers purchase energy 
at a fixed rate based upon historical averages, 
said fixed rate corresponding to a risk position of 
said consumers, wherein the fixed price for the 
consumer transaction is determined by the rela-
tionship: 
Fixed Bill Price = F  + [(C  + T  + LD ) x (α + βE 
i
i
i
i
(W ))] 
l
Wherein, 
F  = fixed costs in period i; 
i
C  = variable costs in period i; 
i
T  = variable long distance transportation costs 
i
in period i; 
LD  = variable local delivery cost in period i; 
i
E(W ) = estimated location-specific weather 
l
indicator in period i; and 
α and β are constants; 
(b)  identifying other energy market participants 
having a counter-risk position to said consumers; 
and 
(c)  initiating a series of transactions between 
said energy provider and said other energy mar-
ket participants at a second fixed rate such that 
said series of transactions balances the risk 
position of said series of consumer transactions. 
Fed. Cir. J.A. A-198 to A-199. 


B.  Proceedings  In The Patent  And  Trade-
mark Office 
1.  In the first Office Action from the Patent and 
Trademark Office (PTO), the patent examiner found 
claims 4-8 of the Bilski  application to be patentable 
over the prior art (claim 4 was the same as above 
except written in dependent form) but rejected claims 
1-3  and 9.  (PTO Office Action, 3/4/99, pp. 2-4.)  In 
response to an amendment filed by the applicants 
(Applicants’  Amendment, 5/3/99), the examiner again 
allowed claims 4-8 and new claims 10-11, but main-
tained the rejection of claims 1-3 and 9 over the prior 
art (PTO Office Action, 7/21/99, pp. 2-5). 
Then, in a third Office Action, the patent examiner 
withdrew the prior art rejections and instead rejected 
all the claims, including claims 4-8 and 10-11, under 
only 35 U.S.C. § 101, as directed to nonstatutory sub-
ject matter.  (PTO Office Action, 11/8/99, pp. 2-3.)  
The examiner stated that “the invention is not imple-
mented on a specific apparatus and merely manipu-
lates [an] abstract idea and solves a purely mathe-
matical problem without any limitation to a practical 
application, therefore, the invention is not directed to 
the technological arts.”  Pet. App. 148a. 
2.  When the § 101 rejection was made final (PTO 
Office Action, 3/28/00, pp. 2-5), the Bilski applicants 
appealed to the PTO Board of Patent Appeals and 
Interferences under 35 U.S.C. § 134(a) (Notice of Ap-
peal, 4/10/00).  The PTO Board had jurisdiction 
pursuant to 35 U.S.C. § 6(b).  An expanded panel of 
the PTO Board affirmed the rejection in a 70-page 
opinion.  Pet. App. 146a-205a.  Admitting that it was 
“struggling to identify some way to objectively ana-
lyze the statutory subject matter issue,”  id.  at 154a, 
the PTO Board analyzed the claims under various 

10 
tests.  The Board considered this Court’s exclusion of 
“abstract ideas”  in  Diamond v. Diehr, 450 U.S. 175 
(1981),  the Federal Circuit’s  “useful, concrete, and 
tangible result”  test from State Street Bank & Trust 
Co. v. Signature Financial Group, Inc., 149 F.3d 1368 
(Fed. Cir. 1998), the “transformation of physical sub-
ject matter”  test discussed by the Board in Ex parte 
Lundgren, 2004 WL 3561262 (B.P.A.I. April 20, 
2004), and the PTO’s  Interim Guidelines for Exami-
nation of Patent Applications for Patent Subject 
Matter Eligibility,  1300  OFFICIAL  GAZETTE  U.S.  PAT. 
& TRADEMARK OFF., Nov. 22, 2005, at 142.  Pet. App. 
180a-190a. 
Applying these various tests, the PTO Board con-
cluded that the Bilski claims did not recite statutory 
subject matter.  The Board reversed the examiner’s 
reasoning, however, affirming its earlier holding in 
Lundgren that the “technological arts” is not a sepa-
rate and distinct test for statutory subject matter.  
Id.  at 180a.  The Board also refuted the examiner’s 
requirement of a specific apparatus because a claim 
may still be patent-eligible “if there is a transforma-
tion of physical subject matter from one state to 
another.”  Id.  at 181a.  Elaborating further, the 
Board stated:  “‘mixing’  two elements or compounds 
to produce a chemical substance or mixture is clearly 
a statutory transformation although no apparatus is 
claimed to perform the step and although the step 
could be performed manually.”  Id. 
According to the PTO Board, however, the Bilski 
claims do not involve any patent-eligible transforma-
tion because they only transform “non-physical 
financial risks and legal liabilities of the commodity 
provider, the consumer, and the market partici-
pants.”  Id.  at 182a.  The Board concluded that the 

11 
claims merely recite an “abstract idea” since they are 
not  “instantiated in some physical way so as to be-
come a practical application of the idea.”  Id. at 184a.  
Recognizing that actual physical acts of individuals 
or organizations would still be required to implement 
the steps of the method, the Board nevertheless held 
that the claims were directed to the “‘abstract idea’ 
itself”  because they cover every possible way of per-
forming those steps.  Id
C.  The Federal Circuit’s En Banc Decision 
The Bilski applicants appealed the PTO Board’s 
decision to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal 
Circuit under 35 U.S.C. § 141.  The Federal Circuit 
had jurisdiction over the appeal pursuant to 28 U.S.C. 
§ 1295(a)(4)(A).  After argument before a panel of the 
court, but before any decision, the Federal Circuit 
ordered that the appeal would be heard en banc.  Pet. 
App. 144a. 
1.  In the en banc decision, the Federal Circuit 
majority held that Bilski’s claims are not eligible  
for patenting and set forth a single, “definitive”  test  
for determining whether a process is patent-eligible 
under § 101:  a process is patent-eligible only if  “(1) it 
is tied to a particular machine or apparatus, or (2) it 
transforms a particular article into a different state 
or thing.”  Id.  at  12a.  Although the Supreme Court 
has twice expressly declined to hold that this so-
called  “machine-or-transformation”  test is the only 
test for patentable processes under § 101, see Parker 
v. Flook, 437 U.S. 584, 588 n.9 (1978); Gottschalk v. 
Benson, 409 U.S. 63, 71 (1972), the Federal Circuit 
majority opinion seized on a sentence from Diehr, 450 
U.S. at 184, quoted from Benson, 409 U.S. at 70, that 
“[t]ransformation and reduction  of an article ‘to a 
different state or thing’ is the clue to the patentability 

12 
of a process claim that does not include particular 
machines.”    Pet. App. 12a (emphasis added by Fed-
eral Circuit).  Taking this Court’s description of the 
machine-or-transformation test as “the” clue literally, 
the majority held that this test was not “optional or 
merely advisory” but rather “the sole test” for patent-
eligible processes.  Id. at 15a-16a & n.11. 
In doing so, the Federal Circuit majority overruled 
its earlier decisions in State Street Bank  and  AT&T 
Corp. v. Excel Communications, Inc., 172 F.3d 1352 
(Fed. Cir. 1999), to the extent they relied on a “useful, 
concrete, and tangible result”  as the test for patent 
eligibility under § 101.  This formulation, originally 
set forth by the en banc Federal Circuit in In re 
Alappat, 33 F.3d 1526, 1544 (Fed. Cir. 1994), was 
discarded in Bilski  as  “inadequate.”  Pet. App. 24a.  
Although  Alappat,  State Street Bank, and AT&T  all 
contain extensive discussions of the same Supreme 
Court cases now relied on in support of the manda-
tory  “machine-or-transformation”  test, the Federal 
Circuit observed that “useful, concrete, and tangible 
result” was “never intended to supplant the Supreme 
Court’s test.”  Id. 
The Federal Circuit majority nevertheless acknowl-
edged some doubt about its  interpretation of this 
Court’s precedent as dictating that the “machine-or-
transformation”  test is the sole test for patentable 
processes.  Citing Diehr, 450 U.S. at 192, where this 
Court stated: 
[W]hen a claim containing a mathematical for-
mula implements or applies that formula in a 
structure or process which, when considered as a 
whole, is performing a function which the patent 
laws were designed to protect (e.g., transforming 
or reducing an article to a different state or 

13 
thing), then the claim satisfies the requirements 
of § 101. 
the majority admitted that “language such as the use 
of ‘e.g.’ may indicate the Supreme Court’s recognition 
that the machine-or-transformation test might re-
quire modification in the future.”  Pet. App. 17a-18a 
n.12.  The majority also recognized that this Court 
“may ultimately decide to alter or perhaps even set 
aside this test to accommodate emerging technolo-
gies.”  Id. at 17a. 
2.  The Federal Circuit majority’s holding that “the 
machine-or-transformation test is the only applicable 
test”  for patent-eligible processes, id.  at  34a, pro-
voked several vigorous dissents.  Reviewing two 
centuries of precedent and statutory history, Circuit 
Judge Newman maintained in dissent that the 
majority’s test is “a new and far-reaching restriction 
on the kinds of inventions that are eligible to 
participate in the patent system.”  Id.  at 60a.  The 
majority’s decision, she wrote, introduces uncertain-
ties that “not only diminish the incentives available 
to new enterprise, but disrupt the settled expecta-
tions of those who relied on the law as it existed.”  Id. 
at 61a. 
Circuit Judge Rader likewise dissented because, in 
his view, the majority’s machine-or-transformation 
test “disrupts settled and wise principles of law.”  Id. 
at 134a.  In particular, he wrote, “the statute does not 
mention ‘transformations’  or any of the other Indus-
trial Age descriptions of subject matter categories 
that this court endows with inordinate importance 
today.”  Id. at 142a-143a.  According to Judge Rader, 
the majority’s test “propagates unanswerable ques-
tions”  and  “links patent eligibility to the age of iron 

14 
and steel at a time of subatomic particles and tera-
bytes.”  Id. at 134a, 142a. 
Also in dissent, Circuit Judge Mayer wrote that the 
majority’s test is “unnecessarily complex and will 
only lead to further uncertainty regarding the scope 
of patentable subject matter.”  Id at 131a.  While the 
PTO and the larger patent community have actively 
sought guidance from the Federal Circuit on this 
issue, Judge Mayer contended that “[t]he majority’s 
‘measured approach’  to the section 101 analysis . . . 
will do little to restore public confidence in the patent 
system.”  Id. at 132a. 
SUMMARY OF THE ARGUMENT 
1.  Section 101 of the Patent Act provides patent 
eligibility for “any”  new and useful process.  Consis-
tent with its plain language, this Court has inter-
preted  § 101 to be extremely broad.  Moreover, the 
courts should not place additional limits on patent-
eligible subject matter that have not been expressed 
by Congress.  To be sure, natural laws and pheno-
mena can never qualify for patent protection because 
they cannot be invented at all.  And abstract ideas 
are not eligible either because they are not “useful” 
and they must be applied to a practical use before 
they  can be patented.  But the Federal Circuit has 
gone much further in limiting patents on processes, 
holding that the only patent-eligible processes are 
those that meet the court’s mandatory “machine-or-
transformation” test. 
Requiring a special test for “process”  inventions 
conflicts with the plain language of the statute and 
this Court’s precedents.  There is no statutory basis 
for treating processes differently from the other cat-
egories of patentable subject matter.  Moreover, the 

15 
Court has twice declined to hold that a process must 
be tied to a machine or transform articles in order to 
be patentable.  By requiring all processes to meet its 
“definitive”  machine-or-transformation test, the Fed-
eral Circuit has repudiated  this Court’s broad, flexi-
ble framework for patent subject matter eligibility. 
2.  The Federal Circuit’s  “machine-or-transforma- 
tion”  test for process patents not only conflicts with 
§ 101 and this Court’s  precedents, but it is also 
inconsistent with the Patent Act’s recognition that 
business methods are eligible for patenting.  In 1999, 
Congress enacted a prior user defense to infringe-
ment of business method patent claims to protect 
those who had mistakenly thought commercialized 
business methods are not patentable.  35 U.S.C. 
§ 273.  In this act, Congress embraced both business 
methods and the Federal Circuit’s State Street Bank 
“useful, concrete, and tangible result” test.  The legis-
lative history of § 273 shows that Congress did not 
intend to limit the defense to only those business 
methods that are tied to machines or that transform 
articles.  Rather, Congress defined patentable busi-
ness methods broadly enough to encompass 
Petitioners’ method of hedging consumption risk.  In 
fact, Congress specifically recited financial transac-
tions like Petitioners’  risk-hedging method as exam-
ples of business methods subject to patenting. 
Consequently, in light of § 273, § 101 must be read 
broadly enough to protect methods of doing business, 
even if they are not tied to a particular machine and 
do not transform articles.  Under the Federal Cir-
cuit’s mandatory machine-or-transformation test, 
however, § 273 would provide a meaningless defense 
to the infringement of a class of patents that cannot 
exist.  That cannot be what Congress intended, and 

16 
the Federal Circuit’s failure to address this conflict 
between its decision and the clear legislative intent 
expressed through the adoption of § 273 warrants 
reversal. 
3.  The Federal Circuit’s machine-or-transforma-
tion test should be rejected because it legislates new 
public policy and disrupts the settled expectations of 
thousands of patent owners and inventors.  Without 
new  guidance from Congress or this Court, the Fed-
eral Circuit has retreated from its formerly technology- 
neutral position by excluding new and useful business- 
related processes, which may or may not be imple-
mented on a machine.  The Federal Circuit has 
essentially confined all process patents to manufac-
turing methods, using a test that may have been 
appropriate during the Industrial Age but no longer 
fits our modern information-based economy.  In doing 
so, the Federal Circuit has ventured into territory 
reserved for the legislature and disrupted the legiti-
mate expectations of patent owners and inventors in 
their property. 
Any concerns over potentially vague or trivial pa-
tents for business methods should be addressed by 
the other requirements for patentability, such as no-
velty, nonobviousness, and definite claiming.  Indeed, 
limiting patentable processes under § 101 to those 
that are tied to machines or transform subject matter 
will do little to combat these types of patents, which 
also fit into other statutory categories of patent-
eligible subject matter.  The existing requirements 
for patentability—properly applied—are better suited 
than the machine-or-transformation test to prevent 
the issuance of vague or trivial patents for business 
methods as well as all other fields. 

17 
4.  Although abstract ideas, laws of nature, and 
natural phenomena are not patentable under § 101, 
this Court has held that a “practical application”  of 
one of these principles may be patented.  A tie to a 
machine or a transformative process is therefore suf-
ficient, but not necessary, to demonstrate a patent-
eligible practical application of a principle.  The prac-
tical application standard has been flexibly applied to 
a variety of inventions and should continue to be 
applied here. 
Although  certain cases have found patent-eligible 
subject matter where a principle has been practically 
applied in either an apparatus or a chemical or man-
ufacturing process, nonmanufacturing processes have 
historically been eligible for patenting under the 
statute too.  The Federal Circuit’s mandatory machine- 
or-transformation test is too restrictive and is unne-
cessary to prevent patenting abstract ideas or laws  
of nature.  Rather, this Court should reaffirm that  
a practical application of a principle in an art or 
process is eligible for patenting. 
5.  Finally, the Federal Circuit’s decision should be 
reversed because the Bilski application claims pa-
tentable subject matter under § 101.  Claim 1 does 
not cover the abstract idea of hedging.  It recites a 
specific series of steps involving the purchase and 
sale of commodities by an intermediary commodity 
provider to manage  consumption risk costs.  Even if 
claim 1 does include the abstract idea of hedging, it is 
still patentable because the abstract idea is practi-
cally applied.  Likewise, the mathematical formula in 
claim 4, which is used to determine the fixed price for 
consumer transactions, is practically applied as part 
of a method of managing weather-related energy 
price risk costs. 

18 
Therefore, the claims in the Bilski application sa-
tisfy § 101.  All of the claims recite a “process,” one of 
the four enumerated categories of patentable subject 
matter.  To the extent the claims invoke a mathe-
matical principle, the principle is practically applied 
in a process to a useful end.  Because the claims 
recite patentable subject matter under  § 101, the 
Federal Circuit’s decision should be reversed. 
ARGUMENT 
I.  THE FEDERAL CIRCUIT’S MANDATORY 
“MACHINE-OR-TRANSFORMATION” TEST 
HAS NO BASIS IN THE PATENT 
STATUTE AND CONFLICTS WITH THIS 
COURT’S PRECEDENTS 
A.  The Plain Language Of The Statute Is 
Extremely Broad, As This Court Has 
Repeatedly Held 
Section 101 of the Patent Act extends patent  pro-
tection to “any new and useful process, machine, 
manufacture, or composition of matter, or any new 
and useful improvement thereof.”  35 U.S.C. § 101.  
To construe the statute, “we begin, of course, with the 
language of the statute.”  Diamond v. Chakrabarty
447 U.S. 303, 308 (1980).  The statutory text uses the 
expansive modifier “any” to introduce four categories 
of patent-eligible subject matter:  process, machine, 
manufacture, or composition of matter.  The meaning 
of “any . . . process” is at issue in this case. 
A “process” is defined as a “process, art or method 
. . . includ[ing] a  new use of a known process, 
machine, manufacture, composition of matter, or ma-
terial.”  35 U.S.C. § 100(b).  In statutory construction, 
“unless otherwise defined, words will be interpreted 
as taking their ordinary, contemporary, common 

19 
meaning.”  Chakrabarty, 447 U.S. at 308 (quoting 
Perrin v. United States, 444 U.S. 37, 42 (1979)).  This 
Court has more than once cautioned that “courts 
‘should not read into the patent laws limitations and 
conditions which the legislature has not expressed.’”  
Chakrabarty, 447 U.S. at 308 (quoting United States 
v. Dubilier Condenser Corp., 289 U.S. 178, 199 
(1933)); see also Diamond v. Diehr, 450 U.S. 175, 182 
(1981). 
Consistent with the statutory language and the 
proscription against reading limitations into the pa-
tent laws, this Court has long interpreted § 101 to be 
extremely broad.  J.E.M. Ag Supply, Inc. v. Pioneer 
Hi-Bred Int’l, Inc., 534 U.S. 124, 130 (2001) (“As this 
Court recognized over 20 years ago in Chakrabarty
the language of § 101 is extremely broad.”);  see also 
Chakrabarty, 447 U.S. at 308 (“Congress plainly con-
templated that the patent laws would be given wide 
scope”); O’Reilley v. Morse, 15 How. (56 U.S.) 62, 131 
(1854) (Grier, J., dissenting) (“[T]he [patent] statute 
is as broad as language can make it.”).  In doing so, 
the Court has also been informed by congressional 
intent that statutory subject matter “include any-
thing under the sun that is made by man.”  
Chakrabarty, 447 U.S. at 309 (quoting S. REP. NO. 82-
1979, at 5 (1952), as reprinted in  1952 U.S.C.C.A.N. 
2394, 2399; H.R. REP. NO. 82-1923, at 6 (1952)).  Like 
§ 101 generally, this  Court has also acknowledged 
that  “[t]he statutory definition of ‘process’  is broad.”  
Parker v. Flook, 437 U.S. 584, 588 n.9 (1978). 
Within the “extremely broad” reach of § 101, “laws 
of nature, physical phenomena, and abstract ideas 
have been  held not patentable.”  Chakrabarty, 447 
U.S. at 309; see also Diehr, 450 U.S. at 185.  These 
cannot be patented because “[a] principle, in the 

20 
abstract, is a fundamental truth; an original cause; a 
motive; these cannot be patented, as no one can claim 
in either of them an exclusive right.”  Le  Roy v. 
Tatham, 14 How. (55 U.S.) 156, 175 (1853).  Other 
than prohibiting patenting laws of nature and ab-
stract ideas, however, the courts should not place 
additional limits on patent-eligible subject matter 
that have not been expressed by Congress.  See 
Diehr, 450 U.S. at 182; Chakrabarty, 447 U.S. at 308.  
That is what the Federal Circuit did here. 
B.  The Federal Circuit’s Mandatory 
 
“Machine-Or-Transformation” Test Con-
flicts With This Court’s Precedents 
1.  The Federal Circuit Erred By Adopt-
ing An Exclusion To Patentable 
Subject Matter That This Court Has 
Twice Rejected 
To this Court’s prohibition against patenting laws 
of nature, physical phenomena, and abstract ideas, 
the Federal Circuit has now added another exclusion:  
processes that do not satisfy its machine-or-trans-
formation test.  “[T]he machine-or-transformation test 
is the only applicable test and must be applied . . . 
when evaluating the patent-eligibility of process 
claims.”  Pet. App. 34a. 
The Supreme Court has twice expressly declined to 
hold that the “machine-or-transformation” test is the 
only test for determining whether a process is patent-
able under § 101, as the Federal Circuit majority has 
now done.  In Gottschalk v. Benson, 409 U.S. 63, 71 
(1972), the Court wrote: 
It is argued that a process patent must either  
be tied to a particular machine or apparatus or 
must operate to change articles or materials to a 

21 
“different state or thing.”  We do not hold that no 
process patent could ever qualify if it did not 
meet the requirements of our prior precedents.  
The Court reaffirmed this position in Flook
The statutory definition of “process” is broad.  An 
argument can be made, however, that this Court 
has only recognized a process as within the 
statutory definition when it either was tied to a 
particular apparatus or operated to change mate-
rials to a “different state or thing.”  As in Benson
we assume that a valid process patent may issue 
even if it does not meet one of these qualifica-
tions of our earlier precedents. 
437 U.S. at 588 n.9 (citations omitted). 
The Federal Circuit acknowledged that this Court 
has twice declined to hold that a process must be tied 
to a machine or transform articles in order to be pa-
tentable.  Pet. App. 15a-16a.  Nonetheless, the Bilski 
majority seized on a passage from Diehr in which the 
Court repeated a quote from Benson:  “[t]ransforma-
tion and reduction of an article ‘to a different state or 
thing’  is  the  clue to the patentability of a process 
claim that does not include particular machines.”  
Pet. App. 15a-16a (quoting Benson, 409 U.S. at 70) 
(emphasis added by Federal Circuit).  But the Su-
preme Court, in the case being quoted, expressly did 
not hold that a process must be tied to a machine or 
transform articles to be eligible for patenting.  Benson
409 U.S. at 71.  And the Court in Diehr  cited the 
transformation test as only an example (using the 
signal ‘e.g.’) of how a process could satisfy § 101.  450 
U.S. at 192. 

22 
2.  The Federal Circuit Erred By Sub-
jecting Processes To Additional 
Conditions For Patent Eligibility 
Requiring a special test for the “process”  category 
of inventions conflicts with the plain language of  
§ 101 and this Court’s precedents.  There is no statu-
tory basis for treating a “process” differently from the 
other categories of patentable subject matter.  The 
language of section 101—“any”  process—“conveys no 
implication that the Act extends patent protection to 
some subcategories of processes but not others.  It 
does not mean ‘some’  or even ‘most,’  but all.”  Pet. 
App. 136a (Rader, J., dissenting). 
Even before the term “process”  was added to the 
Patent Act in 1952, “a process . . . historically enjoyed 
patent protection because it was considered a form of 
‘art’ as that term was used in the 1793 Act.”  Diehr
450 U.S. at 182.  With the addition of the term 
“process”  to  § 101,  “[a]nalysis of the eligibility of a 
claim of patent protection for a ‘process’  did not 
change.”  Id. at 184. 
It is well-settled that an art, or process, enjoys 
patent protection on par with the other types of sub-
ject matter enumerated in the statute.  More than 
one hundred years ago, this Court explained: 
[I]t is only useful arts—arts which may be used 
to advantage—that can be made the subject of a 
patent.  The language of the [1793] statute is, 
that “any person who has invented or discovered 
any new and useful art, machine, manufacture, 
or composition of matter,”  may obtain a patent 
therefor.  Thus, an art—a process—which is use-
ful, is as much the subject of a patent, as a 
machine, manufacture, or composition of matter.  

23 
Of this there can be no doubt,  and it is 
abundantly supported by authority. 
The Telephone Cases,  126 U.S. 1, 533 (1887) (citing 
Corning v. Burden, 15 How. (56 U.S.) 252, 267 (1854); 
Cochrane v. Deener, 94 U.S. 780, 787-88 (1877); 
Tilghman v. Proctor, 102 U.S. 707, 722, 724-25 
(1881);  New Process Fermentation Co. v. Maus, 122 
U.S. 413, 427-28 (1887)) (citation omitted). 
More recently, this Court has applied the same 
patent eligibility analysis to process and product 
claims.  For example, in Benson, this Court analyzed 
a process claim using reasoning originally applied to 
claims to a plant inoculant in Funk Bros. Seed Co. v. 
Kalo Inoculant Co.,  333 U.S. 127, 130 (1948).  “We 
dealt [in Funk Bros.] with a ‘product’ claim, while the 
present case deals with a ‘process’  claim.  But we 
think the same principle applies.”  Benson, 409 U.S. 
at 67-68.  Without support in the statute or direction 
from this Court, the Federal Circuit’s insistence on a 
special test for  “process”  inventions is an error that 
should be reversed. 
3.  The Particulars Of The Machine- 
Or-Transformation Test Compound 
The Errors In The Decision Below 
1.  The Federal Circuit’s emphasis on the relation-
ship between a process and a machine conflicts with 
this Court’s repeated explanations that a process is 
patentable irrespective of any tie to a machine.  “That 
a process may be patentable, irrespective of the par-
ticular form of the instrumentalities used, cannot be 
disputed.”  Cochrane, 94 U.S. at 787.  As explained in 
Corning v. Burden
It is for the discovery or invention of some prac-
ticable method or means of producing a beneficial 

24 
result or effect, that a patent is granted, and not 
for the result or effect itself.  It is when the term 
process is used to represent the means or method 
of producing a result that it is patentable, and it 
will include all methods or means which are not 
effected by mechanism or mechanical combina-
tions. 
56 U.S. at 268;  see also  New Process Fermentation 
Co., 122 U.S. at 427 (“[T]he method or art . . . of the 
patent is patentable as a process, irrespective of the 
apparatus or instrumentality for carrying it out.”).   
A process has been found patentable even when an 
inventor  “testifies that he at first executed his 
process by hand.  Other witnesses . . . say that they 
could do likewise from the information found in the 
patent.  The important thing in this patent is a 
method of procedure, not the particular means by 
which the method shall be practised.”  Expanded 
Metal Co. v. Bradford, 214 U.S. 366, 380-81 (1909). 
Rather than requiring a process to be tied to a 
machine, this Court has distinguished the two cat-
egories.   
A machine is a thing.  A process is an act, or a 
mode of acting.  The one is visible to the eye, —
an object of perpetual observation.  The other is  
a conception of the mind, seen only by its effects 
when being executed  or performed.  Either may 
be the means of producing a useful result. 
Tilghman, 102 U.S. at 728.  In O’Reilley v. Morse
Justice Grier warned in dissent that: 
To look at an art as nothing but a combination of 
machinery, and give it protection only as such, 
against the use of the same or similar devices or 
mechanical equivalents, is to refuse it protection 

25 
as an art.  It ignores the distinction between an 
art  and a machine; it overlooks the clear letter 
and spirit of the statute; and leads to inextricable 
difficulties.   
56 U.S. at 133 (Grier, J., dissenting). 
This Court has explained that identifying any 
means for performing a process is necessary only to 
show utility, not patent-eligible subject matter:   
The patent for the art does not necessarily in-
volve a patent for the particular means employed 
for using it.  Indeed, the mention of any means, 
in the specification or descriptive portion of the 
patent, is only necessary to show that the art can 
be used; for it is only useful arts—arts which 
may be used to advantage—that can be made the 
subject matter of a patent.  
The Telephone Cases, 126 U.S. at 533.  More recently, 
this Court noted that Goodyear’s process for curing 
rubber was patentable regardless of the apparatus 
employed.  “The apparatus for performing the process 
was not patented, and was not material.  The patent 
pointed out how the process could be effected, and 
that was deemed sufficient.”  Diehr, 450 U.S. at 185 
n.8 (quoting Tilghman, 102 U.S. at 722). 
2.  For a process that is not tied to a machine, the 
Federal Circuit’s test requires the transformation of 
“a particular article into a different state or thing.”  
Pet. App. 12a.  By requiring the transformation of 
physical articles or chemicals, the machine-or-trans-
formation test “links patent eligibility to the age of 
iron and steel at a time of subatomic particles and 
terabytes.”  Pet. App. 134a (Rader, J., dissenting).  

26 
Despite acknowledging that “[t]he raw materials  
of many information-age processes . . . are electronic 
signals and electronically-manipulated data,”  the 
majority below suggested that extending patent-
eligible transformations to electronic signals would 
“expand the boundaries of what constitutes patent-
eligible transformations of articles.”  Pet. App. 29a.  
On the contrary, this Court recognized the paten-
tability of such “information-age”  transformations 
long ago.  Alexander Graham Bell’s famed telephone 
patent claimed a method for modifying an electrical 
current to send and receive speech.  “What Bell 
claims is the art of creating changes of intensity in a 
continuous current of electricity . . . and of using that 
electrical condition thus created for sending and 
receiving articulate speech telegraphically.  For that, 
among other things, his patent of 1876 was in our 
opinion issued.”  The Telephone Cases, 126 U.S. at 
533-34. 
The Federal Circuit’s difficulty in applying its 
machine-or-transformation test to “information-age 
processes”  demonstrates the error of a rigid test for 
patentable subject matter.  A primary strength of the 
Patent Act is the lack of subject matter exclusions, 
leaving the door open for emerging technologies.  By 
design,  “Congress employed broad general language 
in drafting § 101 precisely because such inventions 
are often unforeseeable.”  Chakrabarty, 447 U.S. at 
316.  As illustrated by Bell’s case more than century 
ago, the Supreme Court’s broad framework for patent 
eligibility is flexible enough to accommodate innova-
tions of every age. 

27 
4.  The Federal Circuit’s Rigid Test For 
Patentable Subject Matter Repu-
diates This Court’s Broad, Flexible 
Interpretation of § 101 
By requiring a process to meet its “definitive” 
machine-or-transformation test in order to be eligible 
for patenting, Pet. App. 12a, the Federal Circuit 
repudiated this Court’s broad, flexible framework for 
patent subject matter eligibility:  “anything under the 
sun that is made by man”  except  “laws of nature, 
natural phenomena, and abstract ideas.”  Diehr, 450 
U.S. at 182, 185 (citation omitted). 
In recent years, this Court has repeatedly cau-
tioned against adopting special, rigid rules for patent 
cases where this Court’s precedents follow a broader, 
more flexible framework.  In Festo Corp. v. Shoketsu 
Kinzoku Kogyo Kabushiki Co., 535 U.S. 722 (2002), 
this Court rejected the Federal Circuit’s attempt to 
impose an “absolute”  bar to the application of the 
doctrine of equivalents when a patent claim is nar-
rowed during prosecution.  Although this Court had 
previously applied the doctrine in a consistently 
flexible way, the Federal Circuit concluded that the 
flexible approach was “unworkable because it leads to 
excessive uncertainty and burdens legitimate innova-
tion.”  Festo, 535 U.S. at 737.  This Court unanim-
ously rejected the Federal Circuit’s  “absolute bar” 
rule, warning that “courts must be cautious before 
adopting changes that disrupt the settled expecta-
tions of the inventing community.”  Id. at 739. 
In eBay Inc. v. MercExchange, LLC, 547 U.S. 388, 
393-94 (2006), the Court unanimously rejected the 
Federal Circuit’s attempt to impose a rule “unique to 
patent disputes, ‘that a permanent injunction will 
issue once infringement and validity have been ad-

28 
judged.’”  Rather than a special rule for patent cases, 
this Court instructed the Federal Circuit to apply the 
“traditional principles of equity”  to  determine when 
an injunction should issue “in patent disputes no less 
than in other cases governed by such standards.”  Id. 
at 394. 
In  KSR Int’l Co. v. Teleflex Inc., 550 U.S. 398 
(2007), this Court unanimously rejected the Federal 
Circuit’s application of the “teaching, suggestion, or 
motivation”  test as the only test for obviousness 
under  35 U.S.C. § 103.  The Federal Circuit had 
adopted the so-called TSM test in an attempt to re-
solve the question of obviousness “with more unifor-
mity and consistency.”  Id.  at 399.  Rejecting “the 
rigid approach of the Court of Appeals,”  this Court 
noted that its own cases “have set forth an expansive 
and flexible approach inconsistent with the way the 
Court of Appeals applied its TSM test here.”  Id.  at 
415.  The Court cautioned that “when a court trans-
forms the general principle into a rigid rule that 
limits the obviousness inquiry, as the Court of Ap-
peals did here, it errs.”  Id. at 419. 
Like its previous attempts to impose rigid rules for 
patents despite a flexible framework set forth by this 
Court, the Federal Circuit’s mandatory machine-or-
transformation test should be reversed. 

29 
II. SECTION 101 MUST BE READ BROADLY 
ENOUGH TO PROTECT “METHOD[S] OF 
DOING OR CONDUCTING BUSINESS” IN 
LIGHT OF 35 U.S.C. § 273 
A.  The Patent Act Expressly Provides For 
Patents On Business Methods 
In 1999, Congress enacted section 273 of the Patent 
Act, providing a defense to infringement of patents 
for business methods.  35 U.S.C. § 273(b).  The sta-
tute broadly defines business methods:  “the term 
‘method’  means a method of doing or conducting 
business.”  35 U.S.C. § 273(a)(3).  For the defense to 
apply, the business method must be “commercially 
used,” which the statute defines as “use . . . in connec-
tion with an internal commercial use or an actual 
arm’s-length sale or other arm’s-length commercial 
transfer of a useful end result.”  35 U.S.C. § 273(a)(1).  
Like  § 101, the text of § 273 makes no mention of 
methods tied to machines or transforming articles. 
Sections 273 and 101 must be read together as part 
of an harmonious whole.  See  FTC v. Mandel Bros., 
Inc., 359 U.S. 385, 389 (1959) (stating courts should 
“fit, if possible, all parts [of a statute] into an har-
monious whole”).  “It is a fundamental canon of statu-
tory construction that the words of a statute must be 
read in their context and with a view to their place in 
the overall statutory scheme.”  Davis v. Mich. Dept. of 
Treasury, 489 U.S. 803, 809 (1989).  Because §  273 
recognizes patent protection for business methods in 
commercial use, § 101 cannot be construed to exclude 
them from patent protection. 

30 
B.  The Machine-Or-Transformation Test 
For § 101 Disrupts The Balance Struck 
By Congress When Enacting § 273 
1.  In  State Street Bank, the Federal Circuit re-
jected the “ill-conceived”  notion that business me-
thods were excluded  from patenting, noting that 
“[s]ince the 1952 Patent Act, business methods have 
been, and should have been, subject to the same  
legal requirements for patentability as applied to any 
other process or method.”  149 F.3d at 1375.  In fact, 
the court noted, “[t]he business method exception has 
never been invoked by this court, or the CCPA, to 
deem an invention unpatentable.”  Id.  The court also 
noted the PTO’s practice that “[c]laims should not be 
categorized as methods of doing business.  Instead 
such claims should be treated like any other process 
claims.”  Id. at 1377 (quoting Examination Guidelines 
for Computer Related Inventions, 61 Fed. Reg. 7478, 
7479 (Feb. 28, 1996)).  The court concluded that busi-
ness methods, like other processes, are patentable 
under § 101 if they constitute “a practical application 
of an abstract idea” by producing “a useful, concrete 
and tangible result.”  State Street Bank, 149 F.3d at 
1373.  This Court denied certiorari.  525 U.S. 1093 
(1999). 
Congress took up the issue of business method 
patenting the following year, noting that the State 
Street Bank case “added to the urgency of the issue,” 
which is “important to many small and large busi-
nesses, including financial services, software compa-
nies, and manufacturing firms—any business that 
relies on innovative business processes and methods.”  
H.R.  REP.  NO.  106-464, at 122 (1999) (Conf. Rep.).  
Congress understood the Federal Circuit’s broad in-
terpretation of § 101 as reaffirming patent protection 

31 
for processes that produce a useful result.  “As the 
Court [in State Street Bank] noted, the reference to 
the business method exception had been improperly 
applied  to a wide variety of processes, blurring the 
essential question of whether the invention produced 
a  ‘useful, concrete, and tangible result.’”  145  CONG. 
REC.  29272 (1999);  H.R.  REP.  NO.  106-464, at 122 
(1999) (Conf. Rep.) (emphasis added). 
Although several members urged Congress to do 
more  “to address the boundaries of the State Street 
decision,”Congress did not amend the Patent Act to 
limit patent eligibility for business methods.  Instead, 
Congress enacted § 273, striking “an equitable bal-
ance between the interests of U.S. inventors who 
have invented and commercialized business methods 
and processes, many of which until recently were 
thought not to be patentable, and U.S. or foreign 
inventors who later patent the methods and 
processes.”  H.R.  REP.  NO.  106-464, at 121  (1999) 
(Conf. Rep.). 
2.  The legislative history of § 273 shows that Con-
gress did not intend to limit the defense to only those 
business methods that are tied to machines or that 
transform articles.  Rather, Congress defined patent-
able business methods in broad enough terms to 
encompass Petitioners’  method of hedging consump-
tion risk.  Congress applied the defense to all busi-
ness methods, “whether in the form of physical 
products, or in the form of services, or in the form of 
some other useful results; for example, results pro-
                                            
2 145 CONG. REC. 30634 (1999) (statement of Sen. Torricelli); 
see also 145 CONG. REC. 30703 (1999) (statement of Rep. Nadler) 
(“I believe that it is time for Congress to take a closer look at the 
State Street decision.”). 

32 
duced through the manipulation of  data or other 
inputs to produce a useful result.”  145  CONG.  REC. 
29272 (1999).   
Like  § 101 itself, Congress intended the language 
of § 273 to be broad.  “As used in this legislation, the 
term  ‘method’  is intended to be construed broadly 
. . . .  ‘[M]ethod’ includes any internal method of doing 
business, a method used in the course of doing or 
conducting business,  or a method for conducting 
business in the public marketplace.  It includes a 
practice, process, activity, or system that is used in 
the design, formulation, testing, or manufacture of 
any product or service.”  145 CONG. REC. 30703 (1999) 
(statement of Rep. Nadler); 145 CONG.  REC.  30634 
(1999) (statement of Sen. Schumer); see also  145 
CONG. REC. 31007 (1999) (statement of Sen. DeWine) 
(“A method is any systematic way of accomplishing a 
particular business goal.”). 
3.  Congress recognized the special importance of 
business method patents and the prior user defense 
to the financial services industry, which includes 
Petitioners’ consumption risk hedging method.  “The 
State Street  decision has brought [the financial 
services] industry abruptly to the forefront of cutting-
edge patent law protection . . . .”  H.R. REP. NO. 106-
287, pt. 1, at 46 (1999).  In fact, Congress specifically 
recited financial transactions like Petitioners’  risk-
hedging method as examples of business methods 
subject to patenting.  “These financial services may 
embody business methods or processes incorporated 
into any number of systems including, but not limited 
to, trading, investment and liquidity management, 
securities custody and reporting, balance reporting, 
funds transfer, ACH, ATM processing, on-line bank-
ing, check processing, and compliance and risk man-

33 
agement.”  Id.  at 47; see also 145  CONG.  REC.  31007 
(1999) (statement of Sen. DeWine) (“In the context of 
the financial services industry, methods would in-
clude financial instruments (e.g., stocks, bonds, 
mutual funds), financial products (e.g., futures, deriv-
atives, asset-backed securities), financial transac-
tions, the ordering of financial information, [and] any 
system or process that transmits or transforms infor-
mation with respect to eventual investments or 
financial transactions . . . .”). 
4.  Far from harmonizing its § 101 jurisprudence 
with  § 273, the Federal Circuit ignored Congress’s 
acknowledgement of the “useful, concrete, and tangi-
ble result”  test and instead overruled the decisions 
adopting it.  Pet. App. 22a-24a & n.19 (concluding 
that “the ‘useful, concrete and tangible result’ inquiry 
is inadequate” and instructing that “those portions of 
our opinions in State Street and AT&T relying solely 
on a ‘useful, concrete and tangible result’  analysis 
should no longer be relied on”).  In fact, the majority 
below failed to mention §  273 at all.  Despite de-
nouncing the portion of the State Street Bank 
decision that Congress had embraced, the decision 
claimed to reaffirm that business methods remain 
patentable under the machine-or-transformation test.  
Id. at 25a. 
But in reality, the PTO and the courts have applied 
the  new  machine-or-transformation test to reject or 
invalidate business method claims in dozens of cases.  
See, e.g., Pet. Reply Br. 6-7.  Invalidating a patent for 
a method of detecting fraudulent credit card trans-
actions, District Judge Marilyn Patel noted that, 
“[a]lthough the majority declined [to] say so explicitly, 
Bilski’s holding suggests a perilous future for most 
business method patents.”  CyberSource Corp. v. Retail 

34 
Decisions, Inc., 2009 WL 815448,  at *9 (N.D. Cal. 
Mar. 27, 2009).  Indeed, she continued, “[t]he closing 
bell may be ringing for business method patents, and 
their patentees may find they have become baghold-
ers,”  just like “shareholder[s] left holding shares of 
worthless stocks.”  Id. at *10 & n.16.   
Under the mandatory application of the machine-
or-transformation test, § 273 would provide a mea-
ningless defense to the infringement of a class of 
patents that cannot exist.  That cannot be what 
Congress intended, and the Federal Circuit’s failure 
to address this conflict between its decision and the 
clear legislative intent expressed through the adop-
tion of § 273 warrants reversal. 
C.  J.E.M. Ag Supply Illustrates The 
Proper Way To Harmonize § 101 With 
Other Parts Of The Patent Act 
1.  In  J.E.M. Ag Supply,  the alleged infringer of a 
patent for a newly-developed plant argued that the 
patent was invalid under § 101 because Congress 
provided patent protection for plants under two other 
statutes.  534 U.S. at 127.  That argument required 
the Court to consider the proper interpretation of 
§ 101 in light of the settled PTO practice of issuing 
utility patents for plants and congressional amend-
ments to another section of the Patent Act.  The 
Court began by reaffirming its earlier precedent hold-
ing that “the language of § 101 is extremely broad” 
and rejecting “the argument that Congress must ex-
pressly authorize protection for new patentable sub-
ject matter.”  534 U.S. at 130. 
The Court in J.E.M. Ag Supply  observed that the 
PTO had adopted a settled practice of issuing utility 
patents for plants after the Chakrabarty decision.  Id. 

35 
at 144-45.  This “highly visible decision” was relied on 
by the PTO Board and led to the issuance of some 
1,800 utility patents for plants.  Id.  at 145.  “In the 
face of these developments,”  this Court found it sig-
nificant that “Congress has . . . failed to pass legis-
lation indicating that it disagrees with the PTO’s 
interpretation of § 101” allowing for utility patents in 
this area.  Id.  The  J.E.M. Ag Supply  Court noted 
that Congress “has even recognized the availability of 
utility patents for plants”  under  § 101 based on a 
1999 amendment to another provision of the Patent 
Act concerning the right of priority, 35 U.S.C. § 119.  
Id.  “Crucially,  § 119(f) is part of the general provi-
sions of Title 35, not the specific chapter of the [Plant 
Patent Act], which suggests a recognition on the part 
of Congress that plants are patentable under § 101.”  
Id.  In view of the PTO’s history of issuing patents for 
plants, Congress’s failure to indicate its disagreement 
with the practice, and a relevant amendment to 
another section of the Patent Act, the Court 
“decline[d] to narrow the reach of § 101 where Con-
gress has given us no indication that it intends this 
result.”  Id. at 145-46. 
2.  In the present case, the Federal Circuit was 
faced with a remarkably similar situation but reached 
the opposite conclusion, narrowing the scope of § 101 
despite previously settled PTO practice and congres-
sional acknowledgement of business method patents 
in  § 273.  The highly visible State Street Bank  deci-
sion reflected the PTO’s practice of issuing business 
method patents based on the “useful, concrete and 
tangible  result”  standard.  See, e.g., Examination 
Guidelines for Computer Related Inventions, 61 Fed. 
Reg. 7478, 7479 (Feb. 28, 1996);  Interim Guidelines 
for Examination of Patent Applications for Patent 
Subject Matter Eligibility, 1300 OFFICIAL  GAZETTE 

36 
U.S.  PAT.  &  TRADEMARK  OFF., Nov. 22, 2005, at  
142.  The PTO Board affirmed the patentability  
of processes with no ties to machines or physical 
transformation.  See, e.g.,  Ex parte Lundgren, 76 
U.S.P.Q.2d 1385, 2004 WL 3561262 (B.P.A.I. April 
20, 2004). 
In the ten years since State Street Bank, the PTO 
has issued more than 15,000 patents classified in the 
“business methods”  technology group.  As in J.E.M. 
Ag Supply, Congress has given no indication that it 
disagrees with the PTO practice of issuing patents for 
business methods under the State Street Bank  stan-
dard.  Several Congresses have considered bills to 
curtail business method patenting, but none has been 
enacted.  See  H.R. 5364, 106th Cong. (2000); H.R. 
1332, 107th Cong. (2001); H.R. 5299, 108th Cong. 
(2004).  As this Court reaffirmed in J.E.M. Ag Supply
where Congress has declined to place limitations on 
patent-eligible subject matter, the courts should not 
impose them.  534 U.S. at 145-46; see also Diehr, 450 
U.S. at 182; Chakrabarty, 447 U.S. at 308. 
3.  While leaving § 101 untouched in light of these 
developments, Congress added § 273 to the Patent 
Act to provide a defense to infringement of patents 
for  “method[s] of doing or conducting business.”  In 
J.E.M. Ag Supply, this Court found an amendment to 
a general provision of the Patent Act indicative of 
congressional recognition of patentable subject mat-
ter under § 101.  534 U.S. at 145.  Contrary to this 
Court’s guidance in J.E.M. Ag Supply, and despite 
settled PTO practice and congressional intent to the 
contrary, the Federal Circuit adopted a mandatory 
machine-or-transformation test for § 101 that is in-
consistent with § 273. 

37 
Where there is ambiguity in statutory meaning, 
the  “statutes must be construed in their entirety, so 
that the meaning of one provision sheds light upon 
the meaning of another.”  J.E.M. Ag Supply, 534 U.S.  
at 146 (Scalia, J., concurring).  Here, in its effort  
to  “clarify the standards applicable in determining 
whether a claimed method constitutes a statutory 
‘process’ under § 101,” Pet. App. 2a, the Federal Cir-
cuit erroneously restricted § 101 to exclude methods 
of doing business as set forth in § 273. 
III. THE FEDERAL CIRCUIT’S DECISION 
IMPROPERLY LEGISLATES NEW PUB-
LIC POLICY AND DISRUPTS THE 
SETTLED EXPECTATIONS OF PATENT 
OWNERS AND INVENTORS 
The decision below marks an abrupt change in the 
law, imposing “a new and far-reaching restriction on 
the kinds of inventions that are eligible to participate 
in the patent system.”  Pet. App. 60a (Newman, J., 
dissenting).  Without new guidance from Congress or 
this Court, the Federal Circuit has retreated from its 
formerly technology-neutral position that “[t]he use 
of the expansive term ‘any’  in § 101 represents Con-
gress’s intent not to place any restrictions on the 
subject matter for which a patent may be obtained 
beyond those specifically recited in § 101 and the 
other parts of Title 35.”  Alappat, 33 F.3d at 1542.  
This reversal is contrary to “U.S. law and policy 
[that] have embraced advances without regard to 
their subject matter.”  Pet. App. 137a (Rader, J., dis-
senting).  Moreover, sections of the Patent Act other 
than § 101, such as those requiring definite claiming 
and nonobviousness, are better-suited to prevent the 
issuance of vague or trivial patents sometimes la-
beled as “business methods.” 

38 
1.  The  “machine-or-transformation”  test changes 
the law by excluding “many of the kinds of inventions 
that apply today’s electronic and photonic technolo-
gies, as well as other processes that handle data and 
information in novel ways.  Such processes have long 
been patent eligible, and contribute to the vigor and 
variety of today’s Information Age.”  Pet. App. 60a 
(Newman, J., dissenting).  Innovation in the know-
ledge economy thrives beyond the traditional manu-
facturing and engineering fields and includes new 
and useful business-related processes, which may or 
may not be implemented on a machine. 
This Court has long recognized that policy con-
siderations should be left to Congress: 
An examination of the extent of the right to 
process patents requires consideration of the ob-
ject and purpose of the Congress in exercising 
the constitutional power to protect for a limited 
period meritorious inventions or discoveries.   
[The 1793 statute] provides: ‘Any person who has 
invented or discovered any new and useful art, 
machine, manufacture, or composition of matter, 
or any new and useful improvement thereof . . . 
may . . . obtain a patent therefor.’   
This is the statute which secures to inventors the 
right of protection; and it is not the province of 
the courts to so limit the statute  as to deprive 
meritorious inventors of its benefits. 
Expanded Metal Co., 214 U.S. at 382.  More recently, 
the Court reaffirmed the proper role of courts in 
interpreting § 101: 
“[Our] individual appraisal of the wisdom or un-
wisdom of a particular [legislative] course . . . is 

39 
to be put aside in the process of interpreting a 
statute.”  Our task, rather, is the narrow one of 
determining what Congress meant by the words 
it used in the statute; once that is done our 
powers are exhausted.  Congress is free to amend 
§ 101 . . . [b]ut, until Congress takes such action, 
this Court must construe the language of § 101 
as it is. 
Chakrabarty, 447 U.S. at 318 (internal citations 
omitted). 
2.  The machine-or-transformation test introduces 
uncertainties that “not only diminish the incentives 
available to new enterprise, but disrupt the settled 
expectations of those who relied on the law as it ex-
isted.”  Pet. App. 61a (Newman, J., dissenting).  The 
mandatory “machine-or-transformation” test calls into 
question countless process patents issued before the 
PTO and Federal Circuit began applying this more 
restrictive test. 
This Court has more than once admonished that 
“courts must be cautious before adopting changes 
that disrupt the settled expectations of the inventing 
community.”    Festo,  535 U.S. at 739 (citing Warner-
Jenkinson Co. v. Hilton Davis Chem. Co., 520 U.S. 
17, 28 (1997)).  Congressional action is required to 
change such well-settled rules because “[f]undamental 
alterations in these rules risk destroying the legiti-
mate expectations of inventors in their property.”  Id. 
at 739. 
Like the doctrine of equivalents issue in Festo, the 
patentability of processes that apply a fundamental 
principle to produce a useful result was settled.  Busi-
ness methods were patentable before State Street 
Bank, and they remain patentable in accordance with 

40 
Congress’s intent, as evidenced by  35 U.S.C. § 273.  
See, e.g., State Street Bank, 149 F.3d at 1375 (“Since 
the 1952 Patent Act, business methods have been, 
and should have been, subject to the same legal re-
quirements for patentability as applied to any other 
process or method.”).  Tens of thousands of patents 
have issued for business methods, software and infor-
mation processes, and biotechnology methods.  Just 
as this Court warned in Festo,  “[t]o change so 
substantially the rules of the game now could very 
well subvert the various balances the PTO sought to 
strike when issuing the numerous patents which 
have not yet expired and which would be affected by 
our decision.”  535 U.S. at 739 (quoting Warner-
Jenkinson, 520 U.S. at 32 n.6).  By requiring that 
process patents produce some physical transforma-
tion or be tied to a machine, the Federal Circuit has 
ventured into territory reserved for the legislature 
and disrupted the settled expectations of patent 
owners and inventors alike. 
3.  Critics of business method patents often invoke 
trivial patents to explain why patentable subject 
matter should be restricted.  For example, Circuit 
Judge Mayer in dissent below argues for the reversal 
of State Street Bank, citing several “[p]atents granted 
in  the wake of State Street  [that] have ranged from 
the somewhat ridiculous to the truly absurd.”  Pet. 
App. 119a (Mayer, J., dissenting).  These and other 
trivial patents may well deserve elimination from 
patent protection, but the machine-or-transformation 
test would not achieve that end.  Many of the patents 
listed by Judge Mayer claim particular machines  
like databases and controller units, U.S. Patent  
No. 5,862,223  (filed July 24, 1996); point-of-sale 
terminals,  U.S. Patent No. 6,119,099  (filed Aug. 26, 
1997); and data processing systems and public 

41 
communication networks, U.S. Patent No. 6,014,643 
(filed Aug. 26, 1996).  Limiting patentable processes 
under  § 101 to those that are tied to machines or 
transform subject matter will therefore do little to 
combat these types of patents. 
Other requirements for patentability, such as no-
velty and nonobviousness, are better tools  for eli-
minating trivial patents.  Even if an invention covers 
patentable subject matter under § 101, it still must 
satisfy “the conditions and requirements of this title.”  
35 U.S.C. § 101.  These “[c]onditions for patentabil-
ity” include novelty, 35 U.S.C. § 102, and nonobvious 
subject matter, 35 U.S.C. § 103.  These requirements 
provide the PTO and the courts with powerful tools to 
combat trivial patents.  For example, as this Court 
explained in KSR,  § 103 bars patents for improve-
ments that result from mere “common sense”  or 
“ordinary creativity.”  550 U.S. at 420-21. 
Members of this Court have expressed concern over 
business method patents for their “potential vague-
ness and suspect validity.”  eBay, 547 U.S. at 397 
(Kennedy, J., concurring).  Restricting § 101 with the 
mandatory machine-or-transformation test is not the 
best way to address these concerns.  Rather, § 112 of 
the Patent Act requires precision in both a patent’s 
specification and its claims.  Under these require-
ments,  “[t]he specification shall contain a written 
description of the invention, and of the manner and 
process of making and using it, in . . . full, clear, 
concise, and exact terms.”  35 U.S.C. § 112,  ¶ 1.  
Moreover, the patent application must include “one 
or more claims particularly pointing out and dis-
tinctly claiming the subject matter which the appli-
cant regards as his invention.”  35 U.S.C. § 112, ¶ 2. 

42 
When a fundamental principle is involved, this 
Court has explained that precise description is essen-
tial.  “[T]he process through which the new property 
is developed and applied must be stated, with such 
precision as to enable an ordinary mechanic to con-
struct and apply the necessary process.”  Le Roy,  14 
How. (55 U.S.) at 175.  Indeed, rather than lacking 
patentable subject matter, Samuel  Morse’s famed 
claim to the use of electro-magnetism for printing 
letters at a distance was rejected for being overbroad, 
which today would fall under § 112, not § 101.  Morse
15 How. (56 U.S.) at 113 (“The court is of the opinion 
that the claim is too broad, and not warranted by 
law.”).  Similarly, in Benson, the Court expressed 
concern over the broad nature of a claim involving a 
mathematical algorithm:  “Here the ‘process’ claim is 
so abstract and sweeping as to cover both known and 
unknown uses of the BCD to pure binary conversion.”  
409 U.S. at 68.  Proper application of the existing 
requirements of a detailed description and definite 
claiming are better suited than the machine-or-
transformation test to prevent the issuance of vague 
patents for business methods as well as all other 
fields. 
IV.  THIS COURT SHOULD REAFFIRM THE 
“PRACTICAL APPLICATION” RULE FOR 
INVENTIONS INVOLVING FUNDAMEN-
TAL PRINCIPLES 
Over a long line of cases, this Court has explained 
that abstract ideas, laws of nature, and natural 
phenomena are not patentable under § 101, but a 
practical application of one of these principles may be 
patented.  See, e.g., Diehr, 450 U.S. at 187 (“It is now 
commonplace that an application  of a law of nature 
or mathematical formula to a known structure or 

43 
process may well be deserving of patent protection.”); 
Funk Bros.,  333 U.S. at 130 (“If there is to be 
invention from such a discovery, it must come from 
the  application  of the law of nature to a new and 
useful end.”)  (emphasis added).  This Court’s prece-
dents analyzing the practical application of otherwise 
unpatentable principles stretch back more than 150 
years.  The “practical application” standard has been 
flexibly applied to inventions ranging from a process 
for modifying electronic current to transmit speech, 
The Telephone Cases, 126 U.S. 1 (1887), to a process 
for preserving beer, New Process Fermentation Co. v. 
Maus, 122 U.S. 413 (1887), and from Morse’s tele-
graph dictionary, O’Reilley v. Morse, 15 How. (56 
U.S.) 62 (1854), to genetically-engineered micro-
organisms that consume oil spills, Diamond v. 
Chakrabarty, 447 U.S. 303 (1980). 
In certain cases, to be sure, the Court has found 
patent-eligible subject matter where a principle has 
been practically applied in either an apparatus or a 
chemical or manufacturing process.  See, e.g., Diehr
450 U.S. at 191-93; Mackay Radio & Tel. Co. v. Radio 
Corp. of Am., 306 U.S. 86, 94 (1939).  But the Federal 
Circuit majority mistakenly concluded that these con-
ditions are not only sufficient, but necessary.  Pet. 
App. 34a.  This abruptly changed the law, unsettling 
the property rights of patent owners and inventors 
who had relied on years of this Court’s jurisprudence. 
A.  This Court Has Applied Its “Practical 
Application”  Standard Consistently 
With The Language Of § 101 
To determine when a principle is applied in a 
patent-eligible manner, this Court has closely fol-
lowed the language of § 101 itself.  The Court has 
held that a principle is practically applied for the 

44 
purposes of patent eligibility when it is applied (1) to 
a new and useful result; (2) in a particular apparatus 
or structure; or (3) in a particular art or process.  A 
tie to a machine or a transformative process is there-
fore sufficient, but not necessary, to demonstrate a 
patent-eligible practical application of a principle. 
1.  More than 150 years ago, Chief Justice Taney 
summarized the law of patent eligibility as follows: 
“[w]hoever discovers that a certain useful result will 
be produced, in any art, machine, manufacture, or 
composition of matter, by the use of certain means, is 
entitled to a patent for it.”  Morse, 15 How. (56 U.S.) 
at 119.  Provided the inventor describes the “certain 
means” sufficiently, the Chief Justice continued, “the 
patent confers on him the exclusive right to use the 
means he specifies to produce the result or effect he 
describes . . . .”  Id.  The Court’s emphasis on a useful 
result or effect made any machine or transformation 
irrelevant.  “[I]t makes no difference . . . whether the 
effect is produced by chemical agency or combination; 
or by the application of discoveries or principles in 
natural philosophy known or unknown before his 
invention; or by machinery acting altogether upon 
mechanical principles.”  Id. 
When later revisiting the scope of patentable sub-
ject matter, the Court relied on this summary as a 
“clear and exact summary of the law [that] affords 
the key to almost every case that  can arise.”  
Tilghman, 102 U.S. at 728.  The Court in Tilghman 
expounded on the importance of a “useful result”:  “It 
is very certain that the means need not be a machine, 
or an apparatus; it may, as the court says, be a 
process . . . .  Either may be the means of producing a 
useful result.”  Id.  (emphasis in original).  Over the 
years, this Court has repeatedly invoked a practical 

45 
application to a “new and useful end” as a measure of 
patent-eligibility.  See, e.g., Funk Bros., 333 U.S. at 
130 (“If there is to be invention from such a discov-
ery, it must come from the application of the law  
of nature to a new and useful end.”);  New Process 
Fermentation Co., 122 U.S. at 427-28 (“[The process] 
is the performing of a series of acts upon the beer in 
the kraeusen stage, producing new and useful results 
in the art of making marketable beer.”). 
More recently, the Court in Benson  held claims 
containing a mathematical formula unpatentable in 
part because they lacked a “particular end use.”  409 
U.S. at 64 (“The claims were not limited to any par-
ticular art or technology, to any particular apparatus 
or machinery, or to any particular end use.”).  There 
was some initial confusion over this point in the 
Court’s next decision involving § 101.  The majority 
in  Flook  reasoned that the claims in Benson  had  “a 
specific end use contemplated for the algorithm—
utilization of the  algorithm in computer program-
ming,”  437 U.S. at 590 n.11, but three dissenting 
Justices disagreed with this characterization, id.  at 
599  (Stewart, J. dissenting).  Any confusion was re-
solved in Diehr, where the Court restated the proper 
test for subject matter containing a principle.  “[W]hen 
a claim recites a mathematical formula (or scientific 
principle or phenomenon of nature), an inquiry must 
be made into whether the claim is seeking patent 
protection for that formula in the abstract.  A mathe-
matical formula as such is not accorded the protec-
tion of our patent laws.”  450 U.S. at 191.  The Diehr 
Court went on to explain the link between a practical 
application and the language of the Patent Act.  A 
claim containing a mathematical formula satisfies  
§ 101 when it “implements or applies that formula in 
a structure or process which, when considered as a 

46 
whole, is performing a function which the patent laws 
were designed to protect.”  Id. at 192. 
2.  It is well-settled that an application of a prin-
ciple in an apparatus or product is patent-eligible.  
For example, when this Court considered the paten-
tability of a radio antenna with wires angled accord-
ing to a mathematical formula, the Court explained 
that,  “[w]hile a scientific truth, or the mathematical 
expression of it, is not patentable invention, a novel 
and useful structure created with the aid of know-
ledge of scientific truth may be.”  Mackay Radio, 306 
U.S. at 94.  In another example, this Court found  
a genetically-engineered microorganism eligible for 
patenting under § 101 because the claim “is not to a 
hitherto unknown natural phenomenon, but to a non-
naturally occurring manufacture or composition of 
matter—a product of human ingenuity ‘having a 
distinctive name, character [and] use.’”  Chakrabarty
447 U.S. at 309-10 (quoting Hartranft v. Wiegmann
121 U.S. 609, 615 (1887)). 
3.  An application of a principle in an art or process 
is likewise eligible for patenting.  For example, 
Alexander Graham Bell discovered that changing the 
intensity of a continuous electric current to corres-
pond exactly to changes in the density of the air 
caused by the sound of a voice enabled the sound to 
be transmitted over a distance.  “This,”  wrote the 
Court, “was his art.”  The Telephone Cases, 126 U.S. 
at  532.  When Bell “devised a way in which these 
changes in intensity could be made and speech ac-
tually transmitted . . . his art was put in a condition 
for practical use.”  Id.  at 532-33.  The  Telephone 
Cases  noted that the connection of a principle to a 
particular process was key to patentability.  “The 
effect of [the O’Reilley v. Morse] decision was, there-

47 
fore, that the use of magnetism as a motive power, 
without regard to the particular process with which it 
was connected in the patent, could not be claimed, 
but that its use in that connection could.”  126 U.S. at 
534. 
Chemical and manufacturing processes applying 
fundamental principles have long enjoyed patent pro-
tection.  For example, a process for separating ele-
ments of  fats and oils was found patent-eligible 
because the inventor did not claim “a mere principle 
. . . .  He only claims to have invented a particular 
mode of bringing about the desired chemical union 
between the fatty elements and water.”  Tilghman
102 U.S. at 729.  In another example, this Court 
observed that “[i]ndustrial processes [such as pro-
cesses for curing rubber] have historically been 
eligible to receive the protection of our patent laws.”  
Diehr, 450 U.S. at 184 & n.8. 
B.  Nonmanufacturing Processes Have 
Historically Been Eligible For Patent-
ing Under The Statute 
The patent system is not limited to manufacturing 
methods.  Unlike the British system of monopolies, 
which was designed to establish manufacturing in 
England, the U.S. patent system was created to pro-
mote progress in all disciplines and not just methods 
of manufacturing. 
1.  The English patent system began as a way to 
attract industry to Great Britain’s otherwise agrarian 
economy.  Because its industry was “far behind the 
rest of the world,” the Crown offered letters of protec-
tion to foreign artisans to establish their practice in 
England.  Ramon A. Klitzke, Historical Background 
of the English Patent Law, 41 J.  PAT.  OFF.  SOC’Y, 

48 
Sept. 1959, at 615, 623.  These letters of protection 
devolved, however, into “secret negotiations for the 
purpose of attracting skilled foreigners into [the 
Crown’s] own service.”    E. Wyndham Hulme,  The 
History of the Patent System Under the Prerogative 
and at Common Law, 12 L. Q. REV. 141, 144 (1896).  
This practice continued through the 16th century, 
resulting in “flagrant misuse”  including  “granting of 
monopolies in industries which were already 
established in England.”  Klitzke, 41 J.  PAT.  OFF. 
SOC’Y, at 632-33. 
To rein in the abuse of monopolies, the 1624 Sta-
tute of Monopolies was enacted to permit a limited 
14-year monopoly only for the “true and first inven-
tor”  of  “any manner of new  manufacture.”  See  D.F. 
Renn, John Knox’s Plan for Insuring Lives: A Patent 
of Invention in 1778, 101 J. INST. ACTUARIES 285, 285 
(1974).  Consistent with its earliest goals of promot-
ing new industry in England, the monopoly practice 
required that an invention be new, at least to the 
British economy.  Edward C. Walterscheid, THE 
NATURE OF THE INTELLECTUAL  PROPERTY  CLAUSE:  A 
STUDY IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE 50-51 (1961). 
2.  The patents and copyrights clause of the Con-
stitution empowers Congress “[t]o promote the Pro-
gress of Science and useful Arts,  by securing for 
limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive 
Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries.” 
U.S.  CONST.  art. I, §  8, cl. 8.  Though little record 
exists of the drafting of the clause, the very language 
selected by the Constitution’s framers indicates a 
broader purpose.  Rather than adopting the more 
limited English “manner of manufacture” to describe 
subject matter eligible for protection, the framers 
chose “useful arts.”  Indeed, a committee of the Con-

49 
stitutional Convention considered, but discarded, the 
phrase  “useful machines and implements.”  Karl 
Fenning,  The Origin of the Patent and Copyright 
Clause of the Constitution, 11 J. PAT. OFF. SOC’Y 438, 
441-42 (1929).  Scholars have opined that the 
departure from the “manufacture”  limitation of the 
Statute of Monopolies indicates the framers’ intent to 
“encourage  [ ] science, broadly,” unlike the British 
system.  Karl B. Lutz, Patents and Science:  A Clari-
fication of the Patent Clause of the U.S. Constitution
18 GEO. WASH. L. REV. 50, 53-54 (1949).  One of the 
reasons for this departure from “manufacture”  to 
“useful arts”  was the recognition, “even in Great 
Britain that the phrase  ‘new manufactures’  was an 
unduly limited object for a patent system, since it 
seemed to exclude new processes.”  Id
Rather than simply establishing a manufacturing 
industry as in England, the U.S. patent system was 
designed to advance innovation in the public interest.  
James Madison wrote of the patents and copyrights 
clause:  
The utility of this power will scarcely be ques-
tioned.  The copyright of authors has been so-
lemnly adjudged, in Great Britain, to be a right 
of common law.  The right to useful inventions 
seems with equal reason to belong to the inven-
tors.  The public good fully coincides in both 
cases with the claims of individuals.   
THE FEDERALIST NO. 43, at 267 (James Madison) (H. 
Lodge ed. 1888).  Thomas Jefferson, a vocal critic of 
monopolies in general, agreed that “[c]ertainly an 
inventor ought to be allowed a right to the benefit of 
his invention for some certain time. . . . Nobody 
wishes more than I do that ingenuity should receive a 
liberal encouragement.”  Letter to Oliver Evans (May 

50 
1807), 5 WRITINGS OF THOMAS  JEFFERSON, at 75-76 
(Washington ed.).  After U.S. patents began to issue, 
Jefferson wrote, “[a]n act of Congress authorising the 
issuing of patents for new discoveries has given a 
spring to invention beyond my conception.”  Letter to 
Benjamin Vaughan (June 1790), 8 WRITINGS  OF 
THOMAS JEFFERSON, at 50 (Andrew A. Lipscomb et al. 
eds., 1903). 
3.  Before there were specific procedures for grant-
ing patents, inventors applied directly to Congress for 
protection.  The first Congress received fifteen peti-
tions seeking protection for methods and machines 
such as “the principle of applying steam-power  to  
the purpose of navigation,”  “an invention . . . for 
counting, with the utmost precision, the number of 
revolutions or vibrations of any wheel, or other part 
of any mechanical engine or machine,”  “lightning 
rods upon an improved construction,”  and  “manu-
facturing shell buttons of different dimensions.”  P.J. 
Federico, The First Patent Act, 14 J. PAT. OFF. SOC’Y 
237, 241-43 (1932). 
One of the first petitions sought protection for 
methods of applying magnetic variation to determine 
longitude.  John Churchman invented “several differ-
ent methods by which the principles of magnetic 
variation are so explained, that the latitude of a place 
being given, its longitude may be easily determined” 
and petitioned Congress for the exclusive right to sell 
“spheres, hemispheres, maps, charts, and tables, on 
his principles of magnetism.”  Id.  at 239. Congress 
found these methods deserving of protection because 
the inventor applied his ideas in practice.  The con-
gressional committee considering Mr. Churchman’s 
invention found it  

51 
confessedly of very high importance, and his 
ideas on the subject appear to be ingenious:  
That, with a view of applying them to practice, 
he has contrived a map and a globe, whereby to 
show the angles which are made by the intersec-
tion of the real and the magnetic meridians in 
different parts of the earth:  That he is also 
engaged in constructing tables for determining 
the longitude at sea upon magnetic principles. 
Id.  The committee decided that “such efforts deserve 
encouragement, and that a law should pass to secure 
to Mr. Churchman, for a term of years, the exclusive 
pecuniary emoluments to be derived from the pub-
lication of these several inventions.”  Id. at 240.  This 
example illustrates that the U.S. patent system has 
long embraced nonmanufacturing methods.  Further-
more, when an invention involves a fundamental 
principle like magnetism, a “practical  application” 
has long been the hallmark of patent eligibility. 
4.  The first Patent Act provided patent protection 
for “any useful art, manufacture, engine, machine, or 
device, or any improvement therein not before known 
or used.”  Patent Act of 1790, § 1, 1 Stat. 109.  This 
act codified the framers’  intent to provide protection 
to more than methods of manufacturing. 
In 1793, Congress revised the Patent Act, expand-
ing the categories of patentable subject matter to 
include a “composition of matter.”  “[A]ny person or 
persons, being a citizen or citizens of the United 
States, shall allege that he or they have invented any 
new and useful art, machine, manufacture, or com-
position of matter, or any new and useful improve-
ment on any art, machine, manufacture, or composi-
tion of matter.”  Patent Act of 1793, § 1, 1 Stat. 318.  
These statutory categories remained unchanged until 

52 
1952, when the word “process”  replaced  “art.”  It is 
well-settled, however, that “a process . . . historically 
enjoyed patent protection because it was considered a 
form of ‘art’ as that term was used in the 1793 Act.”  
Diehr, 450 U.S. at 182.  As Circuit Judge Newman 
noted in dissent below, under the 1793 Act, patents 
have issued for financial methods such as “detecting 
and preventing counterfeiting, coin counting, [and] 
interest calculation tables”  since the 18th century.  
Pet. App. 88a (Newman, J., dissenting). 
V.  THE FEDERAL CIRCUIT’S DECISION 
SHOULD BE REVERSED BECAUSE THE 
BILSKI APPLICATION CLAIMS PATENT-
ABLE SUBJECT MATTER 
A.  Before  The  PTO  And  Federal Circuit 
Started Applying The Machine-Or-
Transformation Test, Bilski’s Claims 
Passed The Threshold Of § 101 
Under the previously well-settled  “practical appli-
cation”  standard, the PTO twice found that Bilski’s 
claims contained patentable subject matter.  After 
searching the prior art and examining the Bilski 
patent application, the patent examiner determined 
that some of the claims were patentable over the 
prior art but rejected others.  (PTO Office Action, 
3/4/99, pp. 2-4.)  In response, the applicants amended 
the claims, and the examiner again allowed most of 
them but maintained the prior art rejections of the 
others.  (PTO Office Action, 7/21/99, pp. 2-5.)  Then, 
after twice allowing these claims, the PTO withdrew 
all of the remaining prior art rejections and instead 
rejected all of the claims under § 101 as being di-
rected to nonstatutory subject matter.  (PTO Office 
Action, 11/8/99, pp. 2-4.) 

53 
Since this Court’s decision twenty-eight years ago 
in Diehr, the Federal Circuit has been the arbiter of 
statutory subject matter under § 101.  Under a long 
line of that court’s cases, including the en banc deci-
sion in Alappat,  the Bilski claims would likely have 
been found patent-eligible.  In Alappat, the Federal 
Circuit explained that “[t]he use of the expansive 
term  ‘any’  in  § 101  represents Congress’s intent not 
to place any restrictions on the subject matter for 
which a patent may be obtained beyond those 
specifically recited in § 101 and the other parts of 
Title 35.”  33 F.3d at 1542.  Surveying BensonFlook
and  Diehr, the Federal Circuit took note of this 
Court’s  “practical application”  standard.  “[C]ertain 
types of mathematical subject matter, standing alone, 
represent nothing more than abstract ideas  until 
reduced to some type of practical application . . . .”  
Id. at 1543.  Accordingly, the court concluded that a 
rasterizer consisting of a series of circuits that 
perform mathematical calculations was “not a 
disembodied mathematical concept which may be 
characterized as an ‘abstract idea,’  but rather a 
specific machine to produce a useful, concrete, and 
tangible result.”  Id. at 1544. 
In 1998, the Federal Circuit again acknowledged 
that “[t]he repetitive use of the expansive term ‘any’ 
in  § 101 shows Congress’s intent not to place any 
restrictions on the subject matter for which a patent 
may be obtained beyond those specifically recited in 
§ 101.”  State Street Bank, 149 F.3d at 1373.  The 
court also acknowledged the Supreme Court’s warn-
ing that “it is improper to read limitations into § 101 
on the subject matter that may be patented where 
the legislative history indicates that Congress clearly 
did not intend such limitations.”  Id.  The court 
applied the “practical application”  test to conclude 

54 
that a data processing system that transforms data 
representing discrete dollar amounts “constitutes a 
practical application of a mathematical algorithm, 
formula, or calculation, because it produces ‘a useful, 
concrete and tangible result.’”  Id.  
One year later, in AT&T Corp. v. Excel Commu-
nications, Inc., 172 F.3d 1352, 1358 (Fed. Cir. 1999), 
the Federal Circuit upheld the patentability of claims 
to a method for generating message records for inter-
exchange telephone calls.  The court reaffirmed that 
its reasoning in Alappat  and  State Street  Bank  was 
supported by this Court’s decisions in Diehr,  Flook
and  Benson.  Regarding Alappat, the AT&T  court 
concluded: 
[T]he Alappat inquiry simply requires an exami-
nation of the contested claims to see if the 
claimed subject matter as a whole is a disembo-
died mathematical concept representing nothing 
more than a “law of nature” or an “abstract idea,” 
or if the mathematical concept has been reduced 
to some practical application rendering it “use-
ful.”  
Id.  at 1357.  Regarding the State Street Bank deci-
sion, the AT&T court wrote: 
The State Street formulation [is] that a mathe-
matical algorithm may be an integral part of 
patentable subject matter such as a machine or 
process if the claimed invention as a whole is 
applied in a “useful” manner. 
Id
Under the Federal Circuit’s jurisprudence inter-
preting this Court’s  “practical application”  test, the 
Bilski patent application claims would likely have 

55 
been found patent-eligible.  To the extent the claims 
involve mathematical calculations, the invention as a 
whole applies these calculations as part of a process 
for buying and selling energy commodities, resulting 
in a balancing of risk involved in the transactions.  
This practical application of mathematical concepts 
in a useful process is just the type embraced by  
the Federal Circuit until it adopted the mandatory 
machine-or-transformation test. 
To rationalize departing from its line of cases inter-
preting a patent-eligible  “practical application”  of a 
fundamental principle, the Federal Circuit has at-
tempted to distinguish the State Street Bank  and 
Alappat  cases as dealing with machines rather than 
processes.  See, e.g.,  Pet App. 23a n.18; In re 
Comiskey, 554 F.3d 967, 979 n.14 (Fed. Cir. 2009).  
This marks a reversal in the court’s position, which 
previously maintained that, “for the purposes of a 
§ 101 analysis, it is of little relevance whether [a] 
claim . . . is directed to a ‘machine’  or a ‘process,’  as 
long as it falls within at least one of the four enume-
rated categories of patentable subject matter.”  State 
Street Bank, 149 F.3d at 1372; see also AT&T, 172 
F.3d at 1357 (“[W]e consider the scope of § 101 to be 
the same regardless of the form—machine or process— 
in which a particular claim is drafted.”). 
B.  The Claimed Hedging Method Falls 
Within One Of The Enumerated Cat-
egories Of § 101 
Bilski  and Warsaw invented a new way to hedge 
the consumption risk associated with a commodity 
sold by a commodity provider at a fixed price for a 
given period.  J.A. 11.  All of the claims in their 
patent application recite methods, which are included 
in the statutory “process” category.  35 U.S.C. § 100(b) 

56 
(“The term ‘process’ means process, art or method.”).  
The plain language of § 101 extends patent eligibility 
to  “any”  new and useful process.  35 U.S.C. § 101.  
The meaning of the word “any” is clear, so no further 
inquiry is necessary under the statute.  Except in 
rare and exceptional circumstances, “[w]hen we find 
the terms of a statute unambiguous, judicial inquiry 
is complete.”  Garcia v. United States, 469 U.S. 70, 75 
(1984). 
It is true that this Court held in Flook  that  “[t]he 
plain language of § 101 does not answer the ques-
tion.”  437 U.S. at 588.  The Flook  Court reasoned 
that a purely literal reading of § 101 was foreclosed 
by the holding in Benson  that a method for convert-
ing binary-coded decimal numbers into binary num-
bers could not be patented.  Id. at 588-89.  There was 
some disagreement over this point, however, with the 
dissenters arguing that “[t]he recent case of [Benson
stands for no more than this long-established prin-
ciple, which the Court there stated in the following 
words:  ‘Phenomena of nature, though just discov-
ered, mental processes, and abstract intellectual con-
cepts are not patentable, as they are the basic tools of 
scientific and technological work.’”  Flook, 437 U.S. at 
599 (Stewart, J., dissenting) (quoting Benson, 409 
U.S. at 67).  The point was settled when this Court 
later explained that its holdings in Benson and Flook 
“stand for no more than the[] long-established prin-
ciples”  that laws of nature, natural phenomena, and 
abstract ideas are excluded from patent protection.  
Diehr, 450 U.S. at 185. 

57 
C.  Claim 1 Does Not Fall Within One Of 
This Court’s Exceptions To Patent-
Eligible Subject Matter 
Claim 1 does not involve an abstract idea, law of 
nature, or natural phenomenon.  Instead, claim 1 
recites a method for buying and selling commodities 
among commodity consumers, commodity suppliers, 
and an intermediary called a commodity provider.  To 
hedge the risk of fluctuations in consumption based, 
for example, on changing weather, the commodity 
provider offers the commodity at a fixed price to con-
sumers, such as businesses and homeowners.  See 
supra  p. 7; see also  J.A. 11-12.  The commodity pro-
vider then identifies suppliers, called “market partici-
pants,” that have a risk position counter to that of the 
energy consumers.  The commodity provider enters 
into transactions with the market participants at a 
second fixed rate in order to balance the risk of the 
consumer transactions.  See supra p. 7. 
Some have argued that the claims cover the ab-
stract idea of hedging.  For example, the Federal 
Circuit found that claim 1 “would effectively pre-
empt any application of the fundamental concept of 
hedging and the mathematical calculations inherent 
in hedging.”  Pet. App. 36a.  To the contrary, claim 1 
is limited to a specific series of steps involving the 
purchase and sale of commodities involving an inter-
mediary commodity provider that manages consump-
tion risk costs.  The applicants do not claim to have 
invented the concept of hedging, nor does claim 1 
cover all applications of hedging.  A search of the 
PTO database reveals dozens of issued patents with 
the term “hedging” in the title or abstract that would 
not be covered by claim 1, related to hedging risk in 
sports wagers, insurance contracts, employee stock 

58 
options, and the like.  Moreover, even if claim 1 does 
recite an abstract idea, it is still patentable because 
the abstract idea is practically applied, as shown by 
an analysis of claim 4. 
D. Claim 4 Recites A Practical Applica-
tion Of A Mathematical Equation 
Claim 4 includes a mathematical relationship that 
is used to determine the fixed price for the consumer 
transactions in the claimed method.  See supra pp. 7-
8.  It is well settled that a practical application of a 
mathematical formula can be patented.  “A claim 
drawn to subject matter otherwise statutory does not 
become nonstatutory simply because it uses a mathe-
matical formula . . . .”  Diehr, 450 U.S. at 176; see also 
Mackay Radio, 306 U.S. at 94. 
The mathematical formula of claim 4 is practically 
applied as part of a process for managing weather-
related energy price risk costs.  “[W]hen a claim con-
taining a mathematical formula implements or ap-
plies that formula in a structure or process  which, 
when considered as a whole, is performing a function 
which the patent laws were designed to protect . . . 
then the claim satisfies the requirements of § 101.”  
Diehr, 450 U.S. at 192 (emphasis added).  The me-
thod of claim 4 applies the mathematical formula in 
the practice of energy transactions between consum-
ers, providers, and market participants.  The patent 
application details how the fixed cost offered to con-
sumers is determined based on various expenses 
related to the energy business, such as variable 
commodity costs, long distance transportation costs, 
and local delivery costs.  J.A. at 12.  To account for 
weather, the application describes a way to forecast 
weather-driven consumption using historical aver-
ages and statistical modeling techniques.  Id. at 13. 

59 
The mathematical formula of claim 4 is practically 
applied to a useful result, so it is patentable.  Funk 
Bros.,  333 U.S. at 130 (“If there is to be invention 
from . . . a discovery [of a law of nature], it must come 
from the application of the law of nature to a new and 
useful end.”) (emphasis added).  As claim 4 recites, 
the method is designed to manage weather-related 
energy price risk costs sold by an energy provider.  
The claim details a series of transactions for energy 
consumers to purchase energy at a  fixed rate de-
termined by a complex mathematical relationship 
among factors in the energy business.  See supra  
pp. 7-8.  To accomplish the end result of balancing 
the risk positions of the consumer transactions,  
the claim requires that commodity suppliers, called 
“market participants”  are identified and engaged in 
transactions.  Id.  
Applying this Court’s  “practical application”  test, 
the claims in the Bilski patent application satisfy 
§ 101.  All of the claims recite a “process,” one of the 
four enumerated categories of patentable subject 
matter.  To the extent the claims involve a mathe-
matical principle, the principle is practically applied 
in a process to a useful end.  Because the claims 
recite patentable subject matter under § 101, the 
Federal Circuit’s decision should be reversed. 
 
 
 
 
 

60 
CONCLUSION 
The judgment of the court of appeals should be 
reversed. 
Respectfully submitted, 
 
J. MICHAEL JAKES 
Counsel of Record 
ERIKA H. ARNER 
FINNEGAN, HENDERSON,  
FARABOW, GARRETT & 
DUNNER, L.L.P. 
901 New York Avenue, N.W. 
Washington, D.C.  20001 
 
(202) 408-4000 
RONALD E. MYRICK 
DENISE W. DEFRANCO 
FINNEGAN, HENDERSON, 
FARABOW, GARRETT &  
DUNNER, L.L.P. 
55 Cambridge Parkway 
Cambridge, MA  02142 
(617) 452-1600 
 

No. 08-964 
IN THE 
Supreme Court of the United States 
———— 
BERNARD L. BILSKI AND RAND A. WARSAW, 
Petitioners, 
v. 
JOHN J. DOLL, ACTING UNDER SECRETARY OF 
COMMERCE FOR INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND ACTING 
DIRECTOR OF THE UNITED STATES PATENT AND 
TRADEMARK OFFICE, 
Respondent
———— 
On Writ of Certiorari to the 
United States Court of Appeals  
for the Federal Circuit 
———— 
JOINT APPENDIX 
———— 
ELENA KAGAN 
J. MICHAEL JAKES 
Counsel of Record 
Counsel  
 of  Record 
SOLICITOR GENERAL 
ERIKA H. A  
RNER 
DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 
FINNEGAN,     
HENDERSON,  
Washington, D.C.  20530 
FARABOW, GARRETT & 
(202) 514-2217 
DUNNER, L.L.P. 
Counsel for Respondent 
901 New York Avenue, N.W. 
Washington, D.C.  20001 
 
(202) 408-4000 
RONALD E. MYRICK 
DENISE W. DEFRANCO 
FINNEGAN, HENDERSON, 
FARABOW, GARRETT &  
DUNNER, L.L.P. 
55 Cambridge Parkway 
Cambridge, MA  02142 
(617) 452-1600 
Counsel for Petitioners 
 
PETITION FOR CERTIORARI FILED JANUARY 28, 2009 
CERTIORARI GRANTED JUNE 1, 2009 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 
Page 
Relevant Docket Entries in the United States 
Patent and  Trademark Office, Application 
No. 08/833,892; Appeal No. 2002-2257 ....................1 
Relevant Docket Entries in the United States 
Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, No. 
2007-1130 ..................................................................3 
U.S.  Patent Application No. 08/833,892 
entitled “Energy Risk Management Method,” 
filed April 10, 1997 .................................................. 10 
PETITION APPENDIX 
Opinion of Board of Patent Appeals and 
Interferences of  the United States Patent 
and Trademark Office (Sept. 26, 2006) .............. 146a 
Order of U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal 
Circuit Granting a Hearing En Banc (Feb. 
15, 2008) .............................................................. 144a 
En Banc Opinion of U.S.  Court of Appeals for 
the Federal Circuit (Oct. 30, 2008) ......................... 1a 
 

 
IN THE UNITED STATES PATENT AND 
TRADEMARK OFFICE 
———— 
BEFORE THE BOARD OF PATENT APPEALS 
AND INTERFERENCES 
———— 
EX PARTE BERNARD L. BILSKI AND RAND A. WARSAW 
Application No. 08/833,892 
Appeal No. 2002-2257 
———— 
RELEVANT DOCKET ENTRIES 
DATE      NO.       GENERAL DESCRIPTION 
4/10/97    1 
Energy Risk Management Method 
Patent Application filed 
3/4/99    5 
Office Action objecting to claims 4-8; 
rejecting claims 1-3 under 35 U.S.C. 
§ 102(e); and rejecting claim 9 under 
35 U.S.C. § 103(a) 
5/3/99    6 
Applicants’ Amendment amending 
claim 4 and adding new claims 10-
11 
7/21/99    7 
Office Action allowing claims 4-8, 
10, and 11; rejecting claims 1-3 
under 35 U.S.C. § 102(b); and reject- 
ing claim 9 under 35 U.S.C. § 103(a) 
8/30/99    8 
Applicants’ Request for Reconsid- 
eration 
11/8/99    9 
Office Action rejecting claims 1-11 
under 35 U.S.C. § 101 


DATE    NO.           GENERAL DESCRIPTION 
11/15/99  11 
New Drawings 
11/17/99  12 
Applicants’ Supplemental Amend- 
ment amending claim 4  
1/6/00    13 
Applicants’ Response to Office Action 
1/18/00    14 
Applicants’  Supplemental Response 
to Office Action 
3/28/00    15 
Final Office Action rejecting claims 
1-11 under 35 U.S.C. § 101 
4/10/00    16 
Notice of Appeal to the Board of 
Patent Appeals and Interferences 
5/23/00    17 
Appellants’ Brief on Appeal and 
Request for Oral Hearing 
8/15/00    18 
Examiner’s Answer to Appellants’ 
Brief on Appeal 
9/25/00    19 
Appellants’ Reply Brief 
4/3/03    22 
Case heard before Administrative 
Patent Judges Barrett, Fleming, 
and Nagumo 
3/8/06    24 
Case heard before Administrative 
Patent Judges Frankfort, McQuade, 
Barrett, Bahr, and Nagumo 
9/26/06    26 
Decision on Appeal 
11/22/06  27 
Notice of Appeal to the United 
States Court of Appeals for the Fed- 
eral Circuit 


IN THE UNITED STATES COURT OF APPEALS 
FOR THE FEDERAL CIRCUIT 
———— 
No. 2007-1130 
(Serial No. 08/833,892) 
———— 
IN RE BERNARD L. BILSKI AND RAND A. WARSAW 
———— 
RELEVANT DOCKET ENTRIES 
DATE  NO.           GENERAL DESCRIPTION 
1/11/07    1 
Appeal docketed 
3/12/07    5 
Appellants Bernard L. Bilski and 
Rand A. Warsaw, brief filed  
4/30/07    13 
Amicus Curiae American Intellec- 
tual Property Law Association, brief 
filed 
6/13/07    18 
Appellee Director of the United 
States Patent and Trademark 
Office, brief filed 
7/2/07    19 
Appellants Bernard L. Bilski and 
Rand A. Warsaw, reply brief filed 
7/6/07    20 
Joint Appendix filed 
10/1/07    27 
Case heard before  Circuit  Judges 
Bryson, Clevenger, and Moore 
2/15/08    30 
Order granting, sua sponte, a 
hearing en banc and instructing 
parties to  submit supplemental 
briefs 


DATE    NO.         GENERAL DESCRIPTION 
3/6/08    32 
Appellants Bernard L. Bilski and 
Rand A. Warsaw, supplemental 
brief filed 
3/6/08    34 
Appellee Director of the United 
States Patent and Trademark 
Office, supplemental brief filed 
4/3/08    88 
Amicus Curiae Accenture, brief filed 
4/3/08    109 
Amicus Curiae Accenture, corrected 
brief filed 
4/3/08    45 
Amicus Curiae American Civil 
Liberties Union, brief filed  
4/3/08    49 
Amicus Curiae Koninklijke Philips 
Electronics N.V., brief filed 
4/3/08    119 
Amicus Curiae Professor Lee A. 
Hollaar, brief filed 
4/4/08    105 
Amicus Curiae End Software 
Patents, brief filed 
4/4/08    57 
Amicus Curiae Law Professor Kevin 
Emerson Collins, brief filed 
4/4/08    54 
Amici Curiae Reserve Management 
Corporation, PCT Capital LLC, 
Rearden Capital Corp. and Sales 
Optimization Group, brief filed 
4/4/08    63 
Amicus Curiae Washington State 
Patent Law Association, brief filed 
4/7/08    108 
Amicus Curiae American Express 
Company, brief filed 
 


DATE    NO.         GENERAL DESCRIPTION 
4/7/08    96 
Amicus Curiae American Institute 
of Certified Public Accountants, 
brief filed 
4/7/08    118 
Amicus Curiae American Intellec- 
tual Property Law Association, brief 
filed 
4/7/08    125 
Amici Curiae Bank of America 
Corp. and Financial Services In- 
dustry, brief filed 
4/7/08    122 
Amicus Curiae Biotechnology In- 
dustry Organization, brief filed 
4/7/08    106 
Amicus Curiae Boston Patent Law 
Association, brief filed 
4/7/08    104 
Amicus Curiae Business Software 
Alliance, brief filed 
4/7/08    126 
Amicus Curiae Center for Advanced 
Study and Research on Intellectual 
Property (CASRIP) of the Univer- 
sity of Washington School of Law, 
supplemental brief filed 
4/7/08    120 
Amicus Curiae CFPH, LLC, brief 
filed 
4/7/08    116 
Amicus Curiae Computer & Com- 
munications Industry Association, 
brief filed 
4/7/08    124 
Amici Curiae Consumers Union, 
Electronic Frontier Foundation, and 
Public Knowledge, brief filed 
 


DATE    NO.         GENERAL DESCRIPTION 
4/7/08    121 
Amici Curiae Dell Inc., Microsoft 
Corporation, and Symantec  Corpo- 
ration, brief filed 
4/7/08    115 
Amici Curiae Eli Lilly and Company 
and The Association of American 
Medical Colleges, brief filed 
4/7/08    127 
Amicus Curiae Federal Circuit Bar 
Association, brief filed 
4/7/08    103 
Amicus Curiae Fédération Inter- 
nationale Des Conseils En Propriété 
Industrielle, brief filed 
4/7/08    202 
Amicus Curiae Gregory Aharonian, 
brief filed 
4/7/08    72 
Amicus Curiae Houston Intellectual 
Property Law Association, brief 
filed 
4/7/08    107 
Amicus Curiae Intellectual Property 
Owners Association, brief filed 
4/7/08    69 
Amicus Curiae International Busi- 
ness Machines Corporation, brief 
filed 
4/7/08    91 
Amicus Curiae Jason V. Morgan, 
brief filed 
4/7/08    123 
Amici Curiae Pacific Life Insurance 
Company, The Hartford Financial 
Services  Group, Inc., and John 
Hancock Life Insurance Company 
(U.S.A.), brief filed 
4/7/08    113 
Amicus Curiae Red Hat, Inc., brief 
filed 


DATE    NO.         GENERAL DESCRIPTION 
4/7/08    79 
Amicus Curiae Regulatory Data- 
Corp, Inc., brief filed 
4/7/08    102 
Amicus Curiae Roberta J. Morris, 
Esq., Ph.D., brief filed 
4/7/08    114 
Amicus Curiae SAP America, Inc., 
brief filed 
4/7/08    117 
Amicus Curiae Software & Infor- 
mation Industry Association, brief 
filed 
4/7/08    110 
Amici Curiae Ten Law Professors, 
brief filed 
4/7/08    111 
Amicus Curiae 22 Law and Busi- 
ness Professors, brief filed 
4/7/08    128 
Amicus Curiae William Mitchell 
College of Law Intellectual Property 
Institute, brief filed 
4/7/08    112 
Amici Curiae Yahoo! Inc. and 
Professor Robert P. Merges, brief 
filed 
4/14/08    214 
Amicus Curiae American Express 
Company, motion for leave to par- 
ticipate in oral argument 
4/15/08    213 
Amici Curiae Bank of America 
Corp. and Financial Services Indus- 
try, motion for leave to participate 
in oral argument 
4/16/08    226 
Amici  Curiae  Yahoo! Inc. and 
Professor Robert P. Merges, motion 
for leave to participate in oral 
argument 


DATE    NO.         GENERAL DESCRIPTION 
4/17/08    229 
Amicus Curiae American Intellec- 
tual Property Law Association, 
motion for leave to participate in 
oral argument 
4/18/08    230 
Order directing all motions by amici 
seeking oral argument to be filed by 
4/23/08 
4/18/08    231 
Amici Curiae Reserve Management 
Corporation, PCT Capital LLC, 
Rearden Capital Corp. and Sales 
Optimization Group, motion for 
leave to participate in oral argu- 
ment 
4/22/08    232 
Amicus Curiae Business Software 
Alliance, motion for leave to par- 
ticipate in oral argument 
4/23/08    233 
Amicus Curiae Regulatory Data- 
Corp International, LLC,  motion  
for leave to participate in oral 
argument 
4/23/08    234 
Amicus Curiae Eli Lilly and  Com- 
pany, motion for leave to participate 
in oral argument 
4/23/08    235 
Amici Curiae Dell  Inc., Microsoft 
Corporation, and Symantec Corpo- 
ration, motion for leave to par- 
ticipate in oral argument 
4/23/08    236 
Amicus Curiae CFPH, LLC, motion 
for leave to participate in oral 
argument 


DATE    NO.         GENERAL DESCRIPTION 
4/25/08    237 
Order granting motions for leave to 
participate in oral argument by 
Amicus Curiae Regulatory Data-
Corp  International, LLC  and Amici 
Curiae Bank of America Corp. and 
Financial Services Industry, each 
party to be given 10 minutes, and 
denying all other motions for oral 
argument 
5/8/08    251  
Case heard en banc before Chief 
Judge Michel and Circuit  Judges 
Lourie, Schall, Bryson, Gajarsa, 
Linn, Dyk, Prost, Newman, Mayer, 
Rader, and Moore  
10/30/08  257  Judgment entered, affirmed 
10/30/08  256  Opinion for the Court filed by Chief 
Judge Michel. Concurring opinion 
by Circuit Judge Dyk with whom 
Circuit Judge Linn joins. Dissenting 
opinion by Circuit Judge Newman. 
Dissenting opinion by Circuit Judge 
Mayer. Dissenting opinion by Circuit 
Judge Rader. 
12/22/08  255  Mandate issued to the Patent and 
Trademark Office 

10 
In the United States Patent and 
Trademark Office 
U.S. Patent Application No. 08/833,892 entitled 
“Energy Risk Management Method,”  
filed April 10, 1997 
TITLE 
ENERGY RISK MANAGEMENT METHOD 
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 
Related Application 
This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provi-
sional Application No.  60/015,756, filed April 16, 
1996. 
1.  Field of the Invention 
The invention herein relates to methods for manag-
ing the consumption risk costs of a commodity sold at 
a fixed price  and, more particularly, methods for 
managing the weather-related risks associated with 
energy pricing. 
2.  Brief Description of the Prior Art 
Energy consumers nationwide suffer substantial 
cost risk from month-to-month and year-to-year. As 
an illustration, the NYMEX contract for natural gas 
has been the most volatile contract ever traded with 
near-term volatilities regularly exceeding 40 to 70%, 
well above that for all other commodities traded. For 
budget-sensitive customers, actual expenditures for 
energy can easily be 20% or more above or below 
what was budgeted. 

11 
There are two key sources for the energy cost risk 
facing these customers:  price risk and consumption 
risk. In natural gas, price risk is  evidenced  in the 
volatilities of the NYMEX contract and other over-
the-counter location-specific instruments (swaps, ba-
sis swaps, forwards). In electricity, the new NYMEX 
electricity contract is showing at least as much vola-
tility as natural gas. 
Because of the proliferation in price risk manage-
ment tools over the last 5 years, though, price risk is 
now easily managed in energy markets. Consumption 
risk, on the other hand, is not currently managed in 
energy markets. Accordingly, there is a need for a 
fixed bill product to manage total energy cost risk 
including the consumption risk. 
SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION 
The risk management method of the present in-
vention is based upon a fixed bill product which 
essentially guarantees the customer a normal winter 
and locks in  a payment stream (a fixed energy bill) 
for whatever period the consumer wishes. This is not 
the “budget bill” offered by many local distribution 
companies, wherein the consumer pays a temporary 
fixed payment but must make a full accounting in a 
subsequent period in the event actual consumption or 
prices are different than what has been charged for. 
The fixed bill method of the present invention man-
ages the risk-associated costs of a commodity sold by 
a commodity provider at a fixed price. Such risk-
associated costs include the weather-related costs of a 
fixed-price energy bill. However, it is to be distinctly 
understood that the present method can be used for 
any commodity to manage consumption risk in a 
fixed bill price product. The commodity provider in-

12 
itiates a series of transactions with consumers of the 
commodity wherein the consumers purchase the com-
modity at a fixed rate based upon historical averages. 
The fixed rate corresponds to a risk position of the 
consumers. The commodity provider then identifies 
market participants for the commodity who have a 
counter-risk position to that of the consumers. The 
commodity provider then initiates a series of transac-
tions with such market participants at a second fixed 
rate such that the series of market participant trans-
actions balances the risk position of the series of 
consumer transactions. 
DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE  
PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS 
The present invention can best be illustrated in 
connection with the management of weather-related 
risks associated with fixed bill energy pricing. A 
consumer’s unhedged energy bill for a given period i 
can be shown as in Equation (1) below: 
(1)  Energy Bill  = F  + (C  + T  + LD ) x Q  
i
i
i
i
i
i
wherein, 
F  = fixed costs in period i, 
i
C  = variable commodity costs in period i, 
i
T   = variable long distance transportation costs in 
i
period i, 
LD  = variable LDC or local delivery costs in period 
i
i, and 
Q  = consumption in period i. 
i
In Equation (1), the consumer could easily fix a 
portion of the costs by using futures or over-the-
counter instruments to lock in a price on the portion 
of consumption that is known with certainty.  For 

13 
instance, any energy consumption that is not weather 
driven may be highly predictable.  A consumer could 
then fix the cost of this portion of total consumption 
with confidence that an effective hedge is achieved. 
To the extent, however, that the consumption is 
weather driven, the consumer cannot confidently lock 
in a price. 
An industrial consumer with baseload process 
requirements can achieve all the hedge required by 
simply locking in prices. A school district or hospital 
with significant unknown weather-driven require-
ments cannot reduce risk with the same hedge;  a 
large portion of its risk is tied up in the weather risk 
as opposed to the price risk. For these reasons, one 
can think of the consumption variable, Q , as in 
i
Equation (2). 
(2)  Q = f(B , W ) 
i,1
i
i,1
wherein, 
B  = base (predictable) consumption in period i, and 
i
W   = a location-specific weather indicator, either 
i,1
HDD  for heating degree days during the ith period 
i,1
and location l, or CDD  for cooling degree days for the 
i
ith period at location l. For a given day, one takes 65 
degrees less the average daily temperature at a given 
location to find the number of heating degree days 
(HDD) for that day. Similarly, one takes the average 
daily temperature at the same location less 65 de-
grees to find the number of cooling degree days 
(CDD) for that day. Both numbers are by definition 
non-negative. 
For a given consumer, Equation (2) can be esti-
mated with ordinary least squares in a model of the 
form: 

14 
(3)  Q  =  + W +   
i,1
i,1
i
Since goodness of fit is the objective in estimating 
Equation (3), the results of Equation (3) can be 
variously estimated with non-log, semi-log or log-log 
forms. 
Next, an assumption is made that W   ~  N(,), 
i,1
that is, that the HDD or CDD variable of  the 
location-specific weather indicator is normally distri-
buted with mean  and standard deviation . 
With the assembling of the various estimations and 
identities the fixed bill estimate for a consumer can 
be shown as in Equation (4). 
(4)  Fixed Bill = F  + [(C  + T + LD ) x ( + E(W )] 
i
i

i
1
Equation 4 assumes that the provider’s margin is 
included in C . 
i
As Equation (4) shows, the usage level, once esti-
mated for a given consumer in a given location, is 
now fixed as an expected value for purposes of defin-
ing consumption. 
The model presented above identifies a conceptual 
approach to understanding how a fixed bill transac-
tion might be calculated for a consumer. In practice, 
this concept is only a starting point. A provider of 
fixed bill transactions will be much like a provider of 
other risk management tools in that the risk that is 
extracted from consumers must be laid off with 
counterparties that have an opposite appetite for the 
risk. All risk management markets are made up of 
parties with appetites for length positions and parties 
with balancing appetites for short positions. Thus, 
the provider will have the goal of matching “shorts” 
(sales to consumers) with length while maintaining a 
margin between these positions. 

15 
The natural counterparty for the energy transac-
tion discussed above is a reasonably collocated dis-
tribution company who has the opposite economic 
appetite for weather patterns. Where consumers are 
concerned about colder than normal winters, dis-
tribution companies are concerned about warmer 
than normal winters. The opposite risk positions 
make a risk management trade possible. The pro-
vider’s goal then is to find a distribution company 
that is willing to pay an amount of money when the 
winter is colder than normal in return for payments 
to the utility when the winter is warmer than nor-
mal. This is a swap. 
At the simplest level, once Equation (4) is approx-
imated for a given consumer one can divide the 
variable cost portion of the calculated Fixed Bill by 
the E(HDD) or E(CDD) to obtain the provider’s mar-
ginal cost per HDD or CDD. Given this, the provider 
would search for a distribution company interested in 
the swap that satisfies the following condition: 
(5) ∂ Costs/∂/HDD  = 
 
l
∂ Swap Receipts/∂HDDl
Condition (5) simply says that when a provider’s 
costs increase with actual heating degree days at the 
lth location he would want a precisely offsetting swap 
receipt to cover the marginal weather-driven cost. 
Laying off risk for a fixed bill transaction, however, 
is vastly  different than it is for most risk manage-
ment products. This results because (a) weather is 
not a fungible commodity, and (b) the counterparties 
will often desire risk protection at different, imper-
fectly correlated weather locations. Contrasted with a 
situation like the NYMEX contract where a provider 
could establish equal and exactly offsetting positions 
the provider retains some unhedgeable weather risk 

16 
when short positions are established at one  location 
and long positions are established at different loca-
tions.  The best the provider can do is build a book 
around reasonably correlated weather patterns. 
In theory, one could evaluate the economically 
weighted joint probability density function W   ~ 
i,1
N(,) parametrically for all locations in the pro-
vider’s book. However, this proves quickly intractable 
as the number of locations increases to approximately 
three. Rather, the steps taken in pricing a deal, and 
in managing the portfolio, involve the following steps: 
1.  evaluate the usage and all costs for a prospec-
tive deal; 
2.  perform a Monte Carlo simulation across all 
deals at all locations in the book over  the last 20 
years of weather patterns and establish the payoffs 
from each deal under each historical weather pattern; 
3.  assume that the summed payoffs are distributed 
N(,); 
4.  perform one-tail tests to determine the marginal 
likelihood of losing money on the  deal and the mar-
ginal likelihood of retaining at least the design 
margin included in the initial evaluation of Equation 
(4); 
5.  if the transaction as initially priced leads to a 
reduced expected margin or increases  the likelihood 
of a loss add more margin to Equation (4) and vice 
versa until the expected portfolio margin and the 
likelihood of portfolio loss is acceptable. 
With the fixed bill thus calculated for a consumer 
several risks remain for the provider of such service: 
1.  How does the provider allow for the fact that the 
consumer may be encouraged to become less efficient 

17 
in  its utilization of energy now that it can consume 
all it wants for a fixed payment? 
2.  How does the provider allow for price volatility, 
apart from the weather volatility? 
A key feature of the final consumer agreement is 
that energy use per HDD or CDD remains within a 
band established as the annual standard error of the 
intercept in the usage estimation. This is typically a 
band with a width of 2% or so.  In the event the 
consumer uses more energy per degree day than 
shown historically it is penalized. And in the event 
the consumer uses less energy per  degree day it is 
refunded dollars, regardless of whether the energy 
pattern is warmer or colder than expected and used 
in the fixed bill calculation. 
Finally, embedded in the deal pricing steps above, 
the commodity price volatility within the fixed bill 
must be managed. If only the expected value is 
purchased one can guarantee that it will have too 
little or too much fixed price energy available for the 
customer. A rule that seems to work in this regard is 
for  the provider to purchase forward, fixed price 
energy at one standard deviation below the expected 
consumption level for the consumer, and to purchase 
at-the-money calls on the  next two standard devia-
tions of consumption. This strategy covers 86% of the 
possible weather pattern events, with minimal but 
symmetric outliers beyond what is financially cov-
ered. The provider will, of course, want full physical 
coverage on all possible weather patterns. 
While the variable C  implicitly contains fixed for-
i
ward prices, there is no reason why the commodity 
price component of the transaction could not be 
priced as a pure option or a price range. In the call 

18 
option formulation the weather itself would be fixed 
but pricing could be adjusted to allow the consumer 
to benefit if commodity prices fall over the course of 
the transaction. This, of course, would imply an 
option payment by the consumer up front. With a 
price range feature the consumer would give back a 
floor to the provider of equal value to offset the cost of 
the call option. Here then the commodity price would 
not go above the call strike and would fall until the 
market price hit the put strike on the lower end. 
Other option-based structures could include a shar-
ing of price increases and/or decreases with the 
weather fixed. 
Also, through the Monte Carlo simulation process, 
one could establish a cap on the weather. Here, the 
pricing process would run as follows: 
1.  evaluate the usage equation and all costs for a 
prospective deal; 
2.  perform a Monte Carlo simulation across all 
deals at all locations in the book over  the last 20 
years of weather patterns and establish the payoffs 
from each deal under each historical weather pattern 
assuming that the price in the deal being priced 
floats down when the weather is below normal; 
3.  assume that the summed payoffs are distributed 
N(,); 
4.  perform one-tail tests to determine the marginal 
likelihood of losing money on the  deal and the 
marginal likelihood of retaining at least the design 
margin included in the initial evaluation of Equation 
(4); 

19 
5.  continue repricing the margin in the transaction 
until the expected portfolio margin  and likelihood of 
portfolio loss is acceptable; 
6.  established in this way the margin becomes 
essentially the cost of a call option on  weather at 
location l. 
A model is presented that allows for the full risk 
management of a budget sensitive energy consumer. 
Energy consumers have heretofore been able to 
manage price risk but not overall cost risk. This is 
because the weather pattern has been  previously 
unmanageable. With a combination of price risk 
management and the ability to “lay off” weather risk 
to natural counterparties an energy provider can 
provide complete energy cost risk management. 
While certain present preferred embodiments have 
been shown and described, it is distinctly understood 
that the invention is not limited thereto but may be 
otherwise embodied within the scope of the following 
claims. 
CLAIMS: 
1.  A method for managing the consumption risk 
costs of a commodity sold by a commodity provider at 
a fixed price comprising the steps of: 
(a)  initiating a series of transactions between 
said commodity provider and  consumers of 
said commodity wherein said consumers 
purchase said commodity at a fixed rate 
based upon historical averages, said fixed 
rate corresponding to a risk position of said 
consumers; 

20 
(b)  identifying market participants for said 
commodity having a counter-risk position to 
said consumers; and 
(c)  initiating a series of transactions between 
said commodity provider and  said  market 
participants at a second fixed rate such that 
said series of market participant transac-
tions balances the risk position of said series 
of consumer transactions. 
2.  The method of claim 1 wherein said commodity 
is  energy and said market  participants  are trans-
mission distributors. 
3.  The method of claim 2 wherein said consump-
tion risk is a weather-related price risk. 
4.  The method of claim 3 wherein the fixed price 
for the consumer transaction is  determined by the 
relationship: 
Fixed Bill Price = F  + [(C  + T  + LD ) x ( + E(W )] 
i
i
i
i
l
wherein, 
F  = fixed costs in period i; 
i
C  = variable costs in period i; 
i
T   = variable long distance transportation costs in 
i
period i; 
LD  = variable local delivery costs in period i; 
i
E(W ) = estimated location-specific weather indica-
l
tor in period i; and  and  are constants. 
5.  The method of claim 4 wherein said location-
specific weather indicator is at least  one of heating 
degree days and cooling degree days. 

21 
6.  The method of claim 4 wherein said energy 
provider seeks a swap receipt to cover the marginal 
weather-driven cost. 
7.  The method of claim 4 wherein the energy price 
is determined by the steps of: 
(a)  evaluating the usage and all costs for a 
prospective transaction; 
(b)  performing a Monte Carlo simulation across 
all transactions at all  locations for a pre-
determined plurality of years of weather 
patterns and establishing the payoffs from 
each transaction under each historical 
weather pattern; 
(c)  assuming that the summed payoffs are nor-
mally distributed; 
(d)  performing one-tail tests to determine the 
marginal likelihood of losing  money on the 
deal and the marginal likelihood of retaining 
at least the design margin included in the 
initial evaluation of the fixed bill price; and 
(e)  adjusting the margin of the fixed bill price if 
the transaction as initially priced leads to a 
reduced expected margin or increases the 
likelihood of a loss until the expected portfo-
lio margin and the likelihood of portfolio loss 
is acceptable. 
8.  The method of claim 4 wherein a cap  on the 
weather-influenced pricing is established by the steps 
of: 
(a)  evaluating the usage equation and all costs 
for a prospective transaction; 
(b)  performing a Monte Carlo simulation across 
all transactions at all  locations for a pre-

22 
determined plurality of years of weather 
patterns and establishing the payoffs from 
each transaction under each historical 
weather pattern assuming that the price in 
the transaction being priced floats down 
when the weather is below normal; 
(c)  assuming that the summed payoffs are 
normally distributed; 
(d)  performing one-tail tests to determine the 
marginal likelihood of losing  money on the 
transaction and the marginal likelihood of 
retaining at least the design margin 
included in the initial evaluation of the fixed 
price bill; 
(e)  continuing to reprice the margin in the 
transaction until the expected portfolio 
margin and likelihood of portfolio loss is 
acceptable; and 
(f)  establishing the margin as a call option on 
weather at a predetermined location. 
9.  The method of claim 1 wherein said commodity 
provider seeks a swap receipt to cover the price risk 
of the consumer transaction. 
ABSTRACT 
A method is provided for managing the risk-
associated costs of a commodity sold by a commodity 
provider at a fixed price.  Such risk-associated costs 
include the weather-related costs of a fixed-price 
energy bill. The commodity provider initiates a series 
of transactions with consumers of the commodity 
wherein the consumers purchase the commodity at a 
fixed rate based upon historical averages.  The fixed 
rate corresponds to a risk position of the consumers. 

23 
The commodity provider then identifies market 
participants for the commodity who have a counter-
risk position to that of the consumers. The commodity 
provider then initiates a series of transactions with 
the market participants at a second fixed rate such 
that the series of market participant transactions 
balances the risk position of the series of consumer 
transactions. 

Document Outline