No. 08-964
In the
Supreme Court of the United States
_________
BERNARD L. BILSKI and RAND A. WARSAW
Petitioners,
v.
JOHN J. DOLL
Respondent.
_________
On Writ of Certiorari to
The United States Court of Appeals
For the Federal Circuit
_________
BRIEF OF AMICUS CURIAE YAHOO! INC.
IN SUPPORT OF NEITHER PARTY
_________
DUANE R. VALZ
CHRISTOPHER J. WRIGHT *
Yahoo! Inc.
TIMOTHY J. SIMEONE
701 First Avenue
JOSEPH C. CAVENDER
Sunnyvale, CA 94089
Wiltshire & Grannis LLP
(408) 349 3300
Washington, D.C. 20036
(202) 730 1300
*Counsel of Record
AUGUST 2009

i
QUESTION PRESENTED
Section 101 of the Patent Act makes “any new
and useful process, machine, manufacture, or
composition of matter, or any new and useful
improvement thereof” patent-eligible. The question
presented is whether the Federal Circuit erred by
holding that the “definitive test” for determining
whether a process claim is patent-eligible is whether
“it is tied to a particular machine or apparatus” or “it
transforms a particular article into a different state
or thing.”

ii
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
QUESTION PRESENTED...........................................i
TABLE OF AUTHORITIES.......................................iv
INTEREST OF AMICUS CURIAE.............................1
INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY OF
ARGUMENT ..........................................................1
ARGUMENT ...............................................................5
I. THE FEDERAL CIRCUIT’S MACHINE-OR-
TRANSFORMATION TEST IS BOTH
CONCEPTUALLY AND PRACTICALLY
FLAWED ...............................................................5
A. The Machine-or-Transformation Test Is
Conceptually Flawed Because a Patent-
Eligibility Standard Focusing Solely on
Physicality Requirements Is Ill-Adapted
to Today’s Technologies..................................5
B. The Machine-or-Transformation Test Is
Difficult to Apply, Incompletely Captures
the Policies Underlying the Patent Act,
and Threatens to Destabilize Previously
Settled Areas of Law ......................................9
II. THE PLAIN LANGUAGE OF THE PATENT
ACT IS BROAD, AND THIS COURT HAS
PROPERLY FOUND FEW REASONS
SUFFICIENT TO JUSTIFY EXEMPTIONS
FROM THAT LANGUAGE ................................17
A. This Court’s Cases Have Found the Scope
of the Patent Act to be Broad but Not
Unlimited......................................................18

iii
B. This Court has Identified Two
Fundamental Reasons for Excluding
Subject Matter from the Scope of
Section 101....................................................19
C. The Court’s Modern Cases Addressing
Processes Reflect the Limitations
Discussed Above ...........................................21
D. Not All “Algorithms” Fall Within Le Roy’s
Limitations on Patentability........................24
III. THIS COURT SHOULD RECOGNIZE
PRINCIPLES FOR PATENTABILITY
CONSISTENT WITH THE LANGUAGE
AND PURPOSES OF §101.................................26
A. The Federal Circuit’s Recent Tests for
Patentability have Become Unmoored
from the Language and Policies of the Act..26
B. Analysis of Patentability Consistent with
the Fundamental Purposes of the Act
Should Consider Both the Nature of the
Claimed Process and the End Result ..........29
IV. BILSKI’S INVENTION IS NOT PATENT-
ELIGIBLE...........................................................34
CONCLUSION ..........................................................36

iv
TABLE OF AUTHORITIES
CASES:
Page
In re Alappat, 33 F.3d 1526 (Fed. Cir. 1994)..3, 27, 28
Arrhythmia Research Tech., Inc. v. Corazonix
Corp., 958 F.2d 1053 (Fed. Cir. 1992) ...........26, 28
AT&T Corp. v. Excel CommunicationsInc.,
172 F.3d 1352 (Fed. Cir. 1999) ............................27
Ex Parte Atkin, No. 2008-4352, 2009 Pat. App.
LEXIS 1 (BPAI Jan. 30, 2009).......................14, 15
In re Beauregard, 53 F.3d 1583
(Fed. Cir. 1995) ....................................................13
In re Bilski, 545 F.3d 945 (Fed. Cir. 2008)....... passim
Ex parte Bo Li, No. 2008-1213, 2008 Pat. App.
LEXIS 27 (BPAI Nov. 6, 2008) ............................15
Bonito Boats Inc. v. Thunder Craft Boats,
489 U.S. 141 (1989)..............................................21
Cochrane v. Deener, 94 U.S. 780 (1877)....................34
In re Comiskey, 554 F.3d 967 (Fed. Cir. 2009) ...10, 11
In re Comiskey, 2009 U.S. App. LEXIS 400
(Fed. Cir. 2009) ..............................................11, 13
Corning v. Burden, 56 U.S. 252 (1853).....................29
Cybersource Corp. v. Retail Decisions, Inc.,
2009 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 26056 (N.D.
Cal. Mar. 26, 2009)..................................15, 16, 17
Diamond v. Chakrabarty, 447 U.S. 303 (1980)........20
Diamond v. Diehr, 450 U.S. 175 (1981)............ passim
In re Ferguson, 558 F.3d 1359 (Fed. Cir. 2009) ...9, 10

v
Fla. Prepaid Postsecondary Educ. Expense
Bd. v. Coll. Sav. Bank, 527 U.S. 627 (1999) .......17
Funk Bros. Seed Co. v. Kalo Inoculant Co.,
333 U.S. 127 (1948)..............................................20
Ex parte Giacchetti, No. 2008-2866 (BPAI
Mar. 11, 2009) .....................................................15
Gottschalk v. Benson, 409 U.S. 63 (1972)......... passim
Ex parte Gutta, No. 2008-3000 (BPAI
Jan. 15, 2009) ...........................................12, 13, 16
Lab. Corp. of Am. Holdings v. Metabolite
Labs., Inc., 548 U.S. 124 (2006)...............27, 28, 30
Le Roy v. Tatham, 55 U.S. 156 (1852) .............. passim
Ex Parte Mazzara, No. 2008-4741, 2009 WL
291178 (BPAI Feb. 5, 2009).................................15
Ex parte Nawathe, No. 2007-3360
(BPAI Feb. 9, 2009)......................11, 12, 13, 15, 16
Neilson v. Thompson, Web. P.C. 275 ........................33
O’Reilly v. Morse, 56 U.S. 62 (1854) ................. passim
Parker v. Flook, 437 U.S. 584 (1978) ................ passim
State Street Bank & Trust Co. v.
Signature Fin. Group, Inc., 149 F.3d 1368
(Fed. Cir. 1998) ............................................ passim
Tilghman v. Proctor, 102 U.S. 707 (1881) ..........32, 33
Ex Parte Van Beek, No. 2008-2033, 2009
Pat. App. LEXIS 5 (BPAI Jan 16, 2009) .............15
STATUTES AND REGULATIONS:
35 U.S.C. §100(b)...................................................2, 18
35 U.S.C. §101 ................................................... passim

vi
35 U.S.C. §102 .............................................................2
35 U.S.C. §103 .............................................................2
Patent Act of 1790, 1 Stat. 109 (1790)......................31
PATENT:
U.S. Patent No. 5,579,430 (filed Jan. 26, 1995) .........8

INTEREST OF AMICUS CURIAE1
Yahoo! Inc. (“Yahoo!”) provides services to more
than 500 million individuals each month worldwide
and operates one of the world’s most popular
Internet destinations. The company is a leading
innovator in the computing and Internet sectors,
holds
many
patents
relating
to
Internet
communication, and also licenses a variety of
technology patents both to and from third parties.
From time to time, Yahoo! finds it necessary to
enforce its own patent rights as well as to defend
itself against allegations that it infringed a third
party’s patent. Accordingly, Yahoo!’s interest is in a
balanced and efficient patent system that fairly
rewards innovation.
INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY OF
ARGUMENT
The rule announced by the Federal Circuit in this
case, under which a “process” is patent-eligible only
if it is tied to a particular machine or transforms a
physical article into a different state or thing, is both
conceptually and practically flawed. Moreover, the
test represents a misreading of this Court’s
precedents. Yahoo! urges the Court to restore an
understanding of 35 U.S.C. §101 that is faithful to
the broad language of the provision and consistent
1 Counsel for both parties have consented to the filing of this
brief, and their consents have been filed with the Clerk of this
Court. No counsel for a party authored this brief in whole or in
part, and no counsel or party made a monetary contribution
intended to fund the preparation or submission of this brief. No
person other than amicus curiae or its counsel made a
monetary contribution to its preparation or submission.

2
with the purposes of the patent system. That
requires a test designed to identify the limited
exceptions to patent eligibility rather than one that
interposes an unwarranted obstacle to patentability
for a vast array of modern innovations. Notably,
however, Yahoo! supports neither party in this case.
Although the Federal Circuit erred in adopting the
machine-or-transformation test, Bilski’s process
claim is not patent-eligible under a proper reading of
§101.
The language of §101 is sweeping, encompassing
“any new and useful process, machine, manufacture,
or composition of matter, or any new and useful
improvement thereof.” “Process” is defined broadly to
mean “process, art or method, and includes a new
use of a known process, machine, manufacture,
composition of matter, or material.” 35 U.S.C.
§100(b). But while §101 is broadly written, the
conclusion that a claim is patent-eligible under that
provision does not mean that a patent should issue—
35 U.S.C. §§102 and 103, for instance, establish
important limitations relating to novelty and non-
obviousness.
This Court has recognized two related reasons for
limiting the broad language of §101. First, “laws of
nature, natural phenomena, and abstract ideas,”
Diamond v. Diehr, 450 U.S. 175, 185 (1981), are not
patentable because everyone is entitled to share in
what the Court has described as “fundamental
truth[s]” of the natural world. Le Roy v. Tatham, 55
U.S. 156, 175 (1852). Relatedly, the Court has
explained that as a practical matter permitting
excessively broad patents would undermine the

3
purposes of the Patent Act by preempting future
innovations. Id.
The machine-or-transformation test does not
adequately reflect either the statutory language or
these underlying principles governing patentability.
As to the former, neither the ordinary meaning nor
the statutory definition of the word “process” limits
the term to processes tied to machines or to physical
transformations.
To
the
contrary,
Congress’s
separate listing of “process” and “machine” supports
the conclusion that they are separate, so that a
process need not be tied to a particular machine.
Similarly, the language relating to a new “process” is
listed separately from the language relating to a new
“composition of matter,” supporting the conclusion
that a new process need not transform matter to a
new state. As to the latter, cases decided since the
decision below illustrate that with respect to the
cutting-edge issues of today, the test focuses
attention on questions irrelevant to the statute’s
fundamental purpose of rewarding innovation. In
practice, the machine-or-transformation test elevates
form over substance and permits the limited
exceptions to §101 eligibility to swallow the general
rule.
At the Federal Circuit, Yahoo! urged the court to
reject the machine-or-transformation test and to
instead build upon State Street Bank & Trust Co. v.
Signature Financial Group, Inc., which found that a
process is patent-eligible only if it produces a “useful,
concrete[,] and tangible result.” 149 F.3d 1368, 1373
(Fed. Cir. 1998) (quoting In re Alappat, 33 F.3d 1526,
1544 (Fed. Cir. 1994). Notably, however, while the
fact that a process leads to such a result will often

4
distinguish the claimed invention from a natural law
or abstract idea, the State Street test is overinclusive.
To be patent-eligible under §101, a process must also
be circumscribed in scope, limited by clearly defined
steps that are stable, predictable, and reproducible—
i.e.,
it
must
be
“machine-like.”
This
latter
requirement captures the insight of industrial-era
cases that a patent-eligible process is not just any
series of steps, but should be limited to a specific
series of steps so as not to “preempt” other ways to
accomplish the same result.
This case illustrates why the analysis we propose
is superior to the “machine-or-transformation” test.
The problem with Bilski’s patent claim is not that it
fails
to
involve
a
machine
or
a
physical
transformation. The problem is that it essentially
attempts to patent the idea of hedging, at least with
respect to commodities trading, and fails to propose a
specific process for hedging. If Bilski had developed a
process that, in machine-like fashion, directed
commodities traders to take a clearly defined series
of steps to hedge their position, that process might
lead to useful, concrete, and tangible results. In
addition, a patent for such a specific process would
not broadly preempt other methods of hedging, so it
would not foreclose innovators from developing
superior hedging processes. But Bilski does not claim
a specific series of steps that are stable, predictable,
and reproducible—and that failure, rather than the
absence of a machine or a physical transformation, is
why his claims should not be patent-eligible.

5
ARGUMENT
I.
THE FEDERAL CIRCUIT’S MACHINE-
OR-TRANSFORMATION TEST IS BOTH
CONCEPTUALLY AND PRACTICALLY
FLAWED.
At the heart of this case is the question of how to
distinguish processes that should qualify as patent-
eligible subject matter under Section 101 of the
Patent Act from those that should not. The Federal
Circuit found that question can be answered by
focusing exclusively on whether the claimed
invention is “tied to a particular machine or
apparatus” or “transforms a particular article into a
different
state
or
thing”—the
“machine-or-
transformation test.” In re Bilski, 545 F.3d 945, 954-
55 (Fed. Cir. 2008). The Federal Circuit was wrong.
While Bilski’s machine-or-transformation test was
(and remains) a useful proxy for the principles that
distinguish the patentable from the unpatentable in
the context of Industrial Age devices and processes,
it is ill-suited to perform that task in the context of
today’s advanced technologies.
A. The Machine-or-Transformation Test Is
Conceptually Flawed Because a Patent-
Eligibility Standard Focusing Solely on
Physicality Requirements Is Ill-Adapted
to Today’s Technologies.
The
machine-or-transformation
test
was
developed in the context of claims for traditional
electro-mechanical
devices
and
manufacturing
processes. It is an essentially backward-looking test,
limiting patent eligibility today to the kinds of things
for which patents were issued years, decades, or even

6
centuries
ago.
But
the
patent
system
is
fundamentally about advances in technology, about
tomorrow’s innovations, and a test limiting patent
eligibility to yesterday’s technologies makes little
sense.
While a system of precedent is necessarily
somewhat backward-looking, this Court must take
care to ensure that its precedents are not applied to
prevent the law (and especially the forward-looking
law of patents) from keeping pace with changes in
the world in which we live. In adopting the machine-
or-transformation
language
from
this
Court’s
decision in Gottschalk v. Benson as the “definitive
test” for patentability, Bilski, 545 F.3d at 954, the
Federal Circuit ignored this Court’s admonition to
avoid “freez[ing] process patents to old technologies,
leaving no room for the revelations of the new,
onrushing technology.” Benson, 409 U.S. 63, 71
(1972).
Indeed, Benson itself expressly rejected the claim
that the machine-or-transformation test applies is
necessarily exhaustive:
It is argued that a process patent must
either be tied to a particular machine or
apparatus or must operate to change
articles or materials to a “different state
or thing.” We do not hold that no
process patent could ever qualify if it
did not meet the requirements of our
prior precedents.
Id. Several years later, the Court made the same
point in Parker v. Flook, 437 U.S. 584, 588 n.9
(1978):

7
An argument can be made … that this
Court has only recognized a process as
within the statutory definition when it
either
was
tied
to
a
particular
apparatus
or
operated
to
change
materials to a “different state or thing.”
[Citation omitted.] As in Benson, we
assume that a valid process patent may
issue even if it does not meet one of
these qualifications of our earlier
precedents.
Similarly, while this Court’s most recent decision
addressing the scope of patentable subject matter,
Diamond v. Diehr, 450 U.S. 175 (1981), provided
“transforming or reducing an article to a different
state or thing,” id. at 192, as examples of patentable
functions, it did not impose any rigid formula
limiting patentability to such circumstances. Taken
together, this Court’s precedents leave no doubt that
patent eligibility analysis under §101 must be
flexible enough to take account of “new, onrushing
technology.”
The machine-or-transformation test lacks that
flexibility. At a time when many of society’s most
significant technological advances involve electronic
signals and magnetic impulses, the inquiry into
whether there has been a change of tangible
materials to a “different state or thing” is no longer
exhaustive. Similarly, in the realm of computer-
executed processes, the line between a “machine” and
a “process” is indistinct at best. Technically skilled
persons can implement a series of functions in either
“hardware” (e.g., logic circuits embedded on a
microchip) or “software” (e.g., instructions to be

8
executed by a computer). Accordingly, as a
conceptual matter, whether a process is tied to a
particular machine or results in the transformation
of matter no longer reveals whether the process “as a
whole” is “performing a function which the patent
laws were designed to protect.” Id.
A concrete example illustrates this conceptual
failing. Much of the popular music to which
consumers listen today is heard in “MP3” format.
MP3 is a standard for compressing digital audio
files—a
compression
algorithm
based
on
characteristics of human hearing that removes
approximately 90% of the data from digital music
files
without
substantially
affecting
humans’
perception of the reproduced sound. The MP3
algorithm can be thought of as a complex
mathematical formula with a specific application.
But
it
does
not
result
in
any
“physical”
transformation—only the digital data are altered.
Nor is it “tied” to any “particular” machine—indeed,
while a “particular” machine could certainly be built
to run the algorithm, one of its chief benefits is that
it may be run on any “general purpose” computer.
The process may, in other words, be instantiated in
either software or hardware. Few would doubt that
this is the kind of technological advance meriting
patent protection and, in fact, the PTO issued a
patent for MP3 technology. See U.S. Patent No.
5,579,430 (filed Jan. 26, 1995 with a priority date of
Apr. 17, 1989). But this innovation would not appear
to be patentable under a strict interpretation of the
machine-or-transformation test.

9
B. The Machine-or-Transformation Test Is
Difficult to Apply, Incompletely Captures
the Policies Underlying the Patent Act,
and Threatens to Destabilize Previously
Settled Areas of Law.
The cases—both judicial and administrative—
attempting to apply the machine-or-transformation
test since the Federal Circuit’s decision in this case
demonstrate that the test fails to address the real
question of whether an invention should be patent-
eligible. Moreover, because the Federal Circuit’s
reasoning cannot be confined to “process” patents,
the problems with the machine-or-transformation
test are already affecting other areas of patent law
as well.
The Federal Circuit has decided two §101 cases
since its Bilski decision, and both highlight problems
with the machine-or-transformation test. In In re
Ferguson, 558 F.3d 1359, 1361 (Fed. Cir. 2009), the
panel unanimously agreed that process claims for
“[a] method of marketing a product” by sharing a
marketing force for different “products that are made
by a plurality of different autonomous producing
compan[ies]” were not patent-eligible.
Judge
Newman’s
concurrence,
however,
foreshadowed the difficulty of applying a test tied to
physicality requirements in the context of computer-
implemented processes. She noted that, on one hand,
the Bilski court had rejected the “useful, concrete,
and tangible” test of State Street and required that
patent-eligible claims must be tied to a “particular”
machine if they do not involve a transformation of
matter. On the other hand, Judge Newman observed,
the en banc court had not overruled State Street but

10
had instead found that the portfolio management
process at issue there was “performed by a computer,
thus meeting the Bilski test.” Ferguson, 558 F.3d at
1367. Judge Newman plainly doubted whether a test
that requires a tie to a “particular machine” but yet
finds that requirement may be satisfied when a
process is “performed by [a] computer” provides
sufficient guidance to the PTO and other courts.
The Federal Circuit’s second and most recent
post-Bilski patentability decision, In re Comiskey,
was first decided in 2007 but reconsidered by the
original panel in 2009 in light of Bilski. The
applicant advanced both “method” (Claim 1) and
“system”
(Claim
17)
claims
for
“mandatory
arbitration resolution regarding one or more
unilateral [legal] documents” such as wills or
contracts. Comiskey, 554 F.3d 967, 970 (Fed. Cir.
2009). The “method” described by Claim 1 called for
the document and its author to be “enroll[ed] … in a
mandatory arbitration system”; for mandatory
arbitration language to be incorporated into the
document; for parties wishing to challenge the
document to submit a request for arbitration; and for
the dispute to be arbitrated and subject to a final
award or decision. Id. The “system” described by
Claim 17 was nearly identical, except that it called
for the use of several “module[s],” including a
“registration module” for enrolling a person and an
“arbitration module” for incorporating arbitration
language into the unilateral document. Id. at 971. In
addition, four dependent claims explicitly required
the use of a computer or other machine to establish
“access to the mandatory arbitration … through the
Internet, intranet, World Wide Web … or other
communication means.” Id. at 981.

11
On reconsideration, the Comiskey court found
that the process claims were unpatentable because
they “do not require a machine, and … do not
describe a process of manufacture or a process for the
alteration of a composition of matter.” Id. In
contrast, however, the court found that Claim 17’s
recitation of “modules,” together with the dependent
claims’ reference to “access to the mandatory
arbitration”
via
the
Internet
or
other
communications means, “could require the use of a
machine as part of Comiskey’s arbitration system.”
Id.
Dissenting from the denial of rehearing en banc,
Judge Newman wrote that Comiskey’s “Section 101
split between [the] method and system claims does
not conform with any relevant statute or advance
any known policy.” 2009 U.S. App. LEXIS 400, *44
(Fed. Cir. 2009). She argued that if “these steps are
viewed as ‘abstractions’” under Bilski, then “so
simple a drafting gambit as reciting in the claims
that a computer or other device (a calculator? an
abacus?) may be used” should not change that fact.
Id.
According
to
Judge
Newman,
“[i]f
the
replacement of ‘process’ with ‘system’ or ‘module’ …
suffices to provide Bilski’s ‘meaningful limits’ under
Section 101, we should be explicit.” Id. at *45.
Plainly, however, Judge Newman believed that the
Federal Circuit’s Bilski decision should instead be
revisited.
Recent decisions of the Board of Patent Appeals
and Interferences (“BPAI”) cast further doubt on the
distinctions drawn by the machine-or-transformation
test. In Ex parte Nawathe, No. 2007-3360 (BPAI Feb.
9, 2009), for example, the application claimed a

12
method
and
system
for
“inputting
multiple
extensible Markup Language (XML) documents;
creating a data representation of said multiple XML
documents; and reducing redundancy across said
multiple XML documents via a fixed set of tables.”
Slip opat 2. Claims 1 and 16 recited a
“computerized method” comprising these steps, while
Claim 25 claimed an “apparatus” for performing the
steps. Id. at 8-9. The BPAI reasoned that the
“computerized recitation” of Claims 1 and 16 recited
“a general purpose processor … as opposed to a
particular computer specifically programmed for
executing the steps of the claimed method.” Id. at 8.
Accordingly, “under the machine-or-transformation
test, the claimed method fails to recite a particular
machine.” Id. (emphasis added). As to Claim 25,
however, the BPAI found that “since the claim
recites a physical apparatus with physical modules”
for performing the steps of the process, the claim “is
not … directed to an abstract idea.” Id. at 9. Nawathe
thus holds that a computerized process executed by a
“general purpose” machine is not patent eligible, but
an “apparatus” executing the same process is. The
BPAI did not explain how or why this distinction
flows from the language of the Patent Act or
advances its purposes.
In Ex parte Gutta, No. 2008-3000 (BPAI Jan. 15,
2009), the claims were directed to a “computerized
method performed by a data processor” that made
recommendations to a consumer by comparing the
consumer’s user history to that of a third party in a
specific, automated way, importing aspects of the
third party’s user history and displaying the
resulting recommendations to the consumer. Slip op.
at 2. The BPAI rejected this process claim because,

13
under Bilski, “the use of a specific machine must
impose meaningful limits on the claim’s scope to
impart patent-eligibility.” Id. at 5. Neither the use of
a “data processor” nor the “displaying” of results was
sufficient “to impart patentability to a claim
involving the solving of a mathematical algorithm.”
IdGutta is consistent with Nawathe in that a
computerized process was again found unpatentable
in the absence of a “particular” machine. But it is
difficult to see how the application of Gutta’s unique
“mathematical
algorithm”
to
produce
specific
recommendations could be considered an “abstract
idea,” and harder still to see why the application
should be considered any more patentable if the
applicant were to promise to instantiate the claimed
process in an “apparatus.”
The question from Judge Newman’s Comiskey
dissent—whether it makes sense to treat “process”
and “system” claims describing the same invention
differently—also arises in recent BPAI decisions.
Moreover, a related question exists with respect to
so-called “Beauregard claims,” named after the
Federal Circuit’s decision in In re Beauregard53
F.3d 1583 (Fed. Cir. 1995). Beauregard claims recite
a computer-readable storage medium (e.g., a hard
drive, CD, or DVD) containing a set of instructions
that causes a computer to perform a process. While
such claims were once considered unpatentable,
Beauregard’s rule that computer programs contained
on computer-readable media are patentable has now
been in place for nearly 15 years. Recent BPAI
decisions suggest that whether an invention is
claimed as a process (a series of steps for reaching a
result), a system (the same steps performed by a
computer), or a Beauregard claim (the same set of

14
steps recorded on a computer-readable medium) may
be outcome-determinative under §101.
In Ex Parte Atkin, No. 2008-4352, 2009 Pat. App.
LEXIS 1 (BPAI Jan. 30, 2009), the claims described a
method for “converting a unidirectional domain
name to a bidirectional domain name,” so that
Internet domain names could be displayed in a way
that is more meaningful in languages with non-
English reading orders, such as Hebrew (which is bi-
directional). Id. at *13. The claims recited specific,
automated steps for breaking the English domain
name into “a plurality of individual labels,”
evaluating each label for proper bidirectional display
order, and reordering the characters appropriately.
Id. at *7Claim 1 set forth the invention as a process
claim; Claim 5 recited a “computer readable medium
encoded with computer software for accomplishing”
the steps of the method claim; and Claim 9 recited a
“system” including a “label definer” to break the
name into labels, an “inferencer” to establish the
proper direction within labels, and a “character
reorderer”—presumably all software “modules”—to
produce the display order. Id. at *15-19. The BPAI
rejected Claim 1 because it did not “recite any
machine or apparatus or call for transforming an
article into a different state or thing.” Id. at *18.
Similarly, the Board rejected Claim 9 because
neither the “system” label nor the terms “label
definer,” “inference,” and “character reorderer”
necessarily
“impl[ied]
the
presence
of
any
apparatus.” Id. at *19-20. The BPAI, however, left “it
to the Examiner to determine in the first instance
whether [c]laim 5”—the Beauregard claim—“recite[s]

15
patent eligible subject matter.” Id. at *22 n.8.2 Atkin
thus suggests that the same basic invention is not
patentable when claimed as a process (a series of
steps) or as a system (a series of steps performed by
a computer) but may be patentable when made as a
Beauregard claim (a series of steps recorded on a
computer-readable
medium).
And,
of
course,
consistent with Nawathe, the same series of steps
would presumably be patent-eligible were the
inventor to promise to instantiate them in an
“apparatus.”3
A recent district court case, Cybersource Corp. v.
Retail Decisions, Inc., 2009 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 26056
(N.D. Cal. Mar. 26, 2009), rejects the BPAI’s
emphasis on the form in which an invention is
claimed but still manages to add to the analytical
confusion. Plaintiff Cybersource sought to enforce its
patent on an automated process for detecting fraud
in an online credit card transaction. The process
involved using the Internet to obtain information
about other transactions initiated from the same
Internet address and then “verifying the credit card
information based upon the values of [a] plurality of
parameters,” wherein “each value among the
2 Other post-Bilski decisions of the BPAI have generally found
that Beauregard claims are patent-eligible. See, e.g., Ex Parte
Mazzara, No. 2008-4741, 2009 WL 291178 (BPAI Feb. 5, 2009)
(“computer-usable medium” containing software was patent-
eligible); Ex Parte Van Beek, No. 2008-2033, 2009 Pat. App.
LEXIS 5, *1, 7 (BPAI Jan 16, 2009) (“computer-readable
medium” containing a “file format” for storing a specific kind of
data was patent-eligible).
3 The Board reached similar results in Ex parte Giacchetti, No.
2008-2866 (BPAI Mar. 11, 2009), and Ex parte Bo Li, No. 2008-
1213, 2008 Pat. App. LEXIS 27 (BPAI Nov. 6, 2008).

16
plurality of parameters is weighted in the verifying
step according to an importance, as determined by
the merchant, of that value to the credit card
transaction.” Id. at *2-3. Claim 2 described the
invention as a process, while Claim 3 invoked
Beauregard
by
reciting
a
“computer-readable
medium
containing
program
instructions”
for
implementing the same process. Id. at *2. The court
found that there was no “transformation” because
“the claimed methods simply obtain and compare
intangible data.” Id. at *9. And while the invention
certainly used the Internet, the Internet is not a
“particular machine” within the meaning of the
machine-or-transformation test. Id. at *20-24.
Finally, the court disparaged Beauregard on the
grounds that it “was not a decision on the merits of
patentability,” found that there “is at present no
legal doctrine creating a special ‘Beauregard claim,’”
for computer programs embedded in tangible media,
and concluded that Claim 3 (like Claim 2) failed the
“machine-or-transformation
test
for
patent
eligibility.” Id. at *28-31. Cybersource thus cast a
shadow over Beauregard claims but offered no
analysis whatsoever of whether an automated
process for detecting credit card fraud online should
be patentable.
Returning to our earlier example of the MP3
algorithm, the BPAI cases indicate that the method
itself would not be patentable, no more than the
recommendations algorithm of Gutta. Decisions like
Nawathe suggest that that an MP3 “system” reciting
a “general purpose computer” likewise would not be
patentable. On the other hand, a Beauregard claim
reciting the process on a computer-readable medium
might be patentable under BPAI precedent, although

17
Cybersource raises grave doubts on that issue. Of
course, an “apparatus” dedicated to repeatedly
implementing the MP3 algorithm would have the
highest likelihood of being found patent-eligible.
Sometimes it is best to acknowledge that the
emperor has no clothes. These distinctions make no
sense, and they therefore cannot provide the
consistency,
stability,
and
predictability
that
Congress and this Court have found so critical in the
area of patent law. See, e.g., Fla. Prepaid
Postsecondary Educ. Expense Bd. v. Coll. Sav. Bank,
527 U.S. 627, 651 (1999) (noting that the need to
“ensure consistency in the substantive application of
the patent law” motivated Congress to take the
unusual step of creating the Federal Circuit). This
Court should refocus the test for patentability on the
language and purposes of the Patent Act, and
provide guidance capable of being consistently
applied to today’s high-tech innovations.
II.
THE PLAIN LANGUAGE OF THE
PATENT ACT IS BROAD, AND THIS
COURT HAS PROPERLY FOUND FEW
REASONS SUFFICIENT TO JUSTIFY
EXEMPTIONS FROM THAT LANGUAGE.
The discussion above shows that the machine-or-
transformation test set forth by the decision below is
not
working.
The focus
of
this
section
is
understanding why it is not working. In short, the
Federal Circuit adopted its test purporting to provide
guidance for how to distinguish patentable from
unpatentable subject matter without considering
why we make that distinction. That is putting the
cart before the horse. An appropriate and effective

18
test for patentability must reflect the language and
purposes of the Act.
A. This Court’s Cases Have Found the
Scope of the Patent Act to be Broad
but Not Unlimited.
The language of §101 sweepingly authorizes
patents for “any new and useful process, machine,
manufacture, or composition of matter, or any new
and useful improvement thereof.” 35 U.S.C. §101.
The Act’s definition of “process” is likewise broad,
defining the term somewhat circularly as a “process,
art or method, and [the term] includes a new use of a
known process, machine, manufacture, composition
of matter, or material.” 35 U.S.C. §100(b).
Section 101 is thus inclusive on its face, and this
Court has “more than once cautioned that courts
should not read into the patent laws limitations and
conditions which the legislature has not expressed.”
Diehr, 450 U.S. at 182 (internal quotation and
citation omitted). The Court has found that Congress
intended statutory subject matter to be expansive,
including “anything under the sun that is made by
man.” Id. (internal quotation and citation omitted).
At the same time, however, this Court’s
precedents make clear that §101 is not without
limits. In particular, as relevant here, the Court has
held that not every process “in the ordinary sense of
the word” is patentable. See Flook, 437 U.S. at 588-
89. The proper question under §101 is “whether the
method described and claimed is a ‘process’ within
the meaning of the Patent Act.” Benson, 409 U.S. at
64 (emphasis added). In other words, some functions
that are literally “processes” in the everyday sense of

19
the word are not patent-eligible because they are not
processes “within the meaning of the Patent Act.”
The hard question, of course, is how to distinguish
processes that qualify under the Act from those that
do not. Again, answering the question “how” to
distinguish
patent-eligible
inventions
from
unpatentable subject matter depends on the
antecedent question “why” some things should be
patentable and some should not. Any reexamination
of
the
machine-or-transformation
test
must
accordingly analyze the fundamental reasons why
some things are patentable and some things are not.
B. This Court has Identified Two
Fundamental Reasons for Excluding
Subject Matter from the Scope of
Section 101.
More than 150 years ago, in Le Roy, 55 U.S. at
175, this Court first expressly held that “a principle
is not patentable.” More importantly, however, the
Le Roy Court provided two reasons why a principle
should not be patentable. First, the Court explained
that “in the abstract” a principle “is a fundamental
truth; an original cause, a motive” as to which “no
one can claim … an exclusive right.” Id. (emphasis
added). In other words, the Court found that some
things cannot be patented because everyone is
entitled to share freely in the “fundamental truths”
of the natural world. Second, the Court wrote that as
a practical matter patents on broad principles should
not issue because such “monopolies” would only
“discourage arts and manufactures, against the
avowed policy of the patent laws.” Id. In short,
people should not be able to patent inventions—or

20
“principles”—that are so broad that they leave
insufficient room for others to innovate.
Later cases reiterated these reasons for limiting
§101. For example, in Funk Bros. Seed Co. v. Kalo
Inoculant Co., 333 U.S. 127, 130 (1948), the Court
held that “patents cannot issue for the discovery of
the phenomena of nature.” The Court explained that
“the manifestations of the laws of nature” are “free to
all men and reserved exclusively to none.” Id. As a
result, “[h]e who discovers a hitherto unknown
phenomenon of nature has no claim to a monopoly of
it which the law recognizes.” Id. Thus, “Einstein
could not patent his celebrated law that E=mc2; nor
could Newton have patented the law of gravity. Such
discoveries are manifestations of … nature” to which
everyone should have access. See Diamond v.
Chakrabarty, 447 U.S. 303, 309 (1980).
The most famous elaboration of Le Roy’s second
insight—that overbroad claims are not patent-
eligible—came only two years later, in O’Reilly v.
Morse, 56 U.S. 62 (1854). Morse approved an
application for a patent on the process of using
electromagnetism to send telegraph messages. But
the Court rejected Claim 8, which claimed the use of
“electro magnetism, however developed for marking
or printing intelligible characters, signs or letters at
any distances.” Id. The Court reasoned that the
claim was too broad—a future inventor could
discover a different “method of writing or printing at
a distance by means of the electric or galvanic
current, without using any part of the process” in
Morse’s claims, and yet “the inventor could not use it
nor the public have the benefit of it” without Morse’s
permission. Id. at 113. Morse thus recognized that

21
the patentability of an idea declines as its breadth
increases—broad patents impose higher costs on
society than narrow ones because they inhibit future
innovation, and patents should not issue when the
costs outweigh the benefits.In the more than 150
years since Morse, this Court has repeatedly
reaffirmed this fundamental point: The patent
system “reflects a balance between the need to
encourage
innovation
and
the
avoidance
of
monopolies which stifle competition without a
concomitant advance in the ‘Progress of Science and
useful Arts.’” Bonito Boats Inc. v. Thunder Craft
Boats, 489 U.S. 141, 146 (1989).
C. The Court’s Modern Cases Addressing
Processes Reflect the Limitations
Discussed Above.
Among this Court’s modern trilogy of process-
eligibility cases—Gottschalk v. BensonParker v.
Flook, and Diamond v. Diehr—the earliest case,
Benson, most directly addresses the underlying
patentability concerns discussed above. In Benson,
the Court considered a patent application for a
method of converting binary-coded decimal numerals
into pure binary numbers, a process to be performed
by a computer. 409 U.S. at 64. The patent
application disclosed only a series of mathematical
operations to be performed on any number entered
4 The notion of patent overbreadth is plainly related to the
prohibition on patents for “fundamental truths.” The broader an
idea is, the more it resembles a fundamental principle, and the
greater the justification for holding it in common for the good of
all. But Le Roy’s second reason for excluding subject matter
from §101 addresses a distinct concern—patents should not
issue when they would inhibit future innovation.

22
as the input; the process would then provide a new,
binary number as output. The Court began its
analysis by expressly citing Le Roy’s first limitation
on patentability, that a “principle, in the abstract …
cannot be patented, as no one can claim in [it] an
exclusive right.” Id. at 67. But the Benson opinion
also reflected Le Roy’s prohibition on overbroad
patents, noting that the claim was so “abstract and
sweeping as to cover both known and unknown uses”
of the claimed decimal-to-binary conversion formula.
Id. at 68. Indeed, the Court expressly compared the
overbreadth of the claim in Benson to that of the
rejected claim in MorseId. The Benson Court
concluded that the claim was so broad that “if the
judgment below [were] affirmed, the patent would
wholly preempt the mathematical formula and in
practical effect would be a patent on the algorithm
itself.” Id. at 72. This Court thus decided Benson
with Le Roy’s exclusions from patentability in mind,
and in light of those limitations Benson seems an
easy case. The ability to convert decimal numerals
into binary numbers is a feature of the world in
which we live from which all should benefit.
Moreover, mathematics in general is one of the “basic
tools” of scientific and technological work, and
permitting a patent on the process for making this
conversion would surely inhibit innovation in some
areas.
Diehr involved the patentability of a process for
curing synthetic rubber using a previously known
mathematical formula, the “Arrhenius equation.”
Like Benson, the Diehr Court noted that no
individual is entitled to a monopoly over a
“phenomenon of nature” but yet “an application of a
law of nature or mathematical formula … may well

23
be deserving of patent protection.” Diehr, 450 U.S. at
188 & n.11. The Court also acknowledged the second
concern of Le Roy, that a patent should not issue if it
will broadly preempt innovation. In Diehr, however,
while the “claimed process admittedly employ[ed] a
well-known mathematical equation,” the applicants
did not “seek to pre-empt the use of that equation,”
but only “to foreclose from others the use of that
equation in conjunction with all of the other steps in
their claimed process.” Id. at 187. Like Benson, then,
Diehr expressly applied the reasons for limiting
patent eligibility set forth by Le Roy and upheld the
patent because it was consistent with those
principles.
Flook lies both chronologically and conceptually
between Benson and Diehr. In that case, the
application described a process for calculating “alarm
limits” used in monitoring catalytic conversion
processes. Flook, 437 U.S. at 585. According to the
Court, a “mathematical algorithm or formula,” id. at
586, was “the only novel feature of respondent’s
method.” Id. at 588. The Court appears to have
assumed that all “mathematical algorithms” fall into
the Le Roy prohibition on patenting “phenomena of
nature” and held that because there was nothing else
“novel” about the claimed invention a patent could
not issue. Id. at 594-98.
Notably, however, Diehr was more cautious than
Flook on the question whether an “algorithm” is
necessarily
unpatentable.
Diehr
characterized
Benson
as
holding
that
“an
algorithm,
or
mathematical formula, is like a law of nature, which
cannot be the subject of a patent.” 450 U.S. at 186.
But Diehr cautioned that the term “algorithm” may

24
have much broader meanings than Benson’s
definition of a “procedure for solving a given type of
mathematical problem,” and the Diehr Court
specifically declined to “pass judgment on whether
processes falling outside” that narrow definition
would be patentable. 450 U.S. at 186 & n.9. Diehr
accepted the result in Flook, however, reasoning that
it was just like Benson because an “alarm limit” is
“simply a number and the … application sought to
protect a formula for computing this number.” Id. at
186.
D. Not All “Algorithms” Fall Within Le Roy’s
Limitations on Patentability.
The question reserved by Diehr—whether some
algorithms may be patentable—has taken on greatly
increased significance with the growing ubiquity of
computers. Generally speaking, an algorithm is a
finite sequence of instructions, an explicit, step-by-
step procedure for completing a task. This broad
definition of algorithm sounds, of course, much like a
“method” or “process.” But it also sounds like a
computer
program.
Today’s
powerful
and
sophisticated computer hardware allows many
processes that were once instantiated in “particular”
machines—from sound studio mixing boards used for
processing music to many of the most sophisticated
devices used in manufacturing—to be accomplished
by computers implementing algorithms.
Diehr correctly suggests that the patentability of
such algorithms should turn on the Patent Act and
its purposes, not on labels or categories. The
principles set forth in Le Roy again shed considerable
light on the issue. As discussed above, Le Roy
indicates that “principles in the abstract” (e.g., laws

25
of nature) from which all should benefit should not
be patentable, nor should patents issue that would
leave others unable to innovate. But the MP3
algorithm discussed supra at 8, for example, is not a
“law of nature.” Neither is it an “abstract idea.” A
particular computerized process for converting large
audio files to small ones while preserving the
perceived quality of the sound reproduced is simply a
tool developed by humans to accomplish a particular
task. Such a tool is no more a law of nature or
abstract idea than the cotton gin.
The Le Roy/Morse principle that patents should
not issue if they will broadly “pre-empt” innovation
also suggests a need to distinguish patentable from
unpatentable algorithms. It would make no sense to
grant exclusive rights over F=MA, E=mc2, or the
Benson formula for converting decimal numbers to
binary ones because these are tools that everyone
needs to be able to innovate freely. These insights
are functionally irreplaceable, unique resources—we
cannot expect further innovation to produce a better
way to calculate the force generated by a moving
object, and preventing people from taking advantage
of this formula will thus reduce rather than spur
innovation. Again, however, the MP3 algorithm is
quite different. Granting exclusive rights over one
way to reduce audio file sizes will not inhibit
innovation—to the contrary, issuing a patent on this
method of reducing file sizes may well spur others to
invent better (and thus more valuable) ways to
achieve the same end.
In short, this Court should take care to ensure
that the categories “laws of nature,” “natural
phenomena,”
and
“abstract
ideas”
are
not

26
unreflectively conflated or expanded beyond the
boundaries justified by the policies underlying
exclusions from §101. Categorization should not be
allowed to substitute for analysis. Unfortunately,
however, that is precisely what has happened in
many of the Federal Circuit cases on patentability
decided since Diehr.
III.
THIS COURT SHOULD RECOGNIZE
PRINCIPLES FOR PATENTABILITY
CONSISTENT WITH THE LANGUAGE
AND PURPOSES OF §101.
A. The Federal Circuit’s Recent Tests for
Patentability have Become Unmoored
from the Language and Policies of the
Act.
The Federal Circuit has been obliged to address
the patent eligibility of “new, onrushing technology”
many times since Diehr. In recent years, the court
has vacillated between two tests for the patentability
of a process—one privileging physicality as the key to
patentability, and one emphasizing that the result of
a patentable process must be useful, concrete, and
tangible. Unfortunately, neither test fully reflects
the broad language of §101 or the reasons why we
distinguish patentable from unpatentable subject
matter discussed above.
In Arrhythmia Research Technology, Inc. v.
Corazonix Corp., 958 F.2d 1053 (Fed. Cir. 1992), the
Federal Circuit found the claimed process—which
involved a programmed computer that translated
analog electrocardiograph signals into digital form—
patent-eligible
because
it
“transform[ed]
one
physical, electrical signal into another.” Id. at 1060-

27
61 (emphasis added). Two years later, in In re
Alappat, 33 F.3d 1526 (Fed. Cir. 1994), the Federal
Circuit again applied a physicality test to determine
whether
Alappat’s
rasterizer—a
computer
programmed to display waveform data in a way that
smoothed out the effects of noise and other
distractions—was patentable subject matter. The
Court determined that the programming permitting
the computer to act as a rasterizer effectively creates
a new, patent-eligible machine. Id. at 1545. Plainly,
however, in both cases the physicality analysis was
somewhat unsatisfying: electric signals are not very
“physical” in the common sense, and re-programming
a computer does not really create a new “machine.”
Moreover, neither case explained why patentability
should turn on whether the invention claimed a
physical transformation or a machine.
The more recent cases of State Street and AT&T
Corp. v. Excel CommunicationsInc., 172 F.3d 1352
(Fed. Cir. 1999), responded to the difficulty of
applying physicality requirements to algorithmically
driven electronic processes by examining the results
an invention would produce. Specifically, State Street
found that a process applying a mathematical
algorithm is patentable if it produces a “useful,
concrete and tangible result.” The Court held that a
claimed data processing system for managing
investment accounts produced such a result: “a final
share price momentarily fixed for recording and
reporting purposes.” 149 F.3d at 1373.
The State Street test, however, was also
unsatisfying. Dissenting from the dismissal of the
writ in Laboratory Corp. of America Holdings v.
Metabolite Laboratories, Inc., 548 U.S. 124, 136-37

28
(2006), Justice Breyer wrote that the notion that all
processes are patentable so long as they produce a
“useful, concrete and tangible result” seems contrary
to this Court’s precedents. For example, “[t]he Court
… has invalidated a claim to the use of
electromagnetic current for transmitting messages
over long distances even though it produces a result
that seems ‘useful, concrete, and tangible.’” Id.
(citing Morse). Justice Breyer explained that the Lab.
Corp. claims “described [a] natural law,” Id. at 137,
that should be “free to all men and reserved
exclusively to none.” Id. at 127-28. Justice Breyer
also emphasized that “[patent] protection in [some]
cases … would too severely interfere with, or
discourage, development and the further spread of
useful knowledge itself.” Id. at 128.
Like Justice Breyer in Lab. Corp., the Federal
Circuit’s decision below rejected the “useful, concrete,
and tangible” test of State Street. But while Justice
Breyer’s analysis returned to Le Roy’s fundamental
principles underlying patentability, the Federal
Circuit’s Bilski decision returned to the physicality
analysis of Arrhythmia and Alappat, elevating the
machine-or-transformation test as the sole test for
patentability. Bilski, 545 F.3d at 961. As further set
forth below, while that analysis may be helpful in
some circumstances, it is not a sufficient basis on
which to distinguish the patentable from the
unpatentable.

29
B. Analysis of Patentability Consistent with
the Fundamental Purposes of the Act
Should Consider Both the Nature of the
Claimed Process and the End Result.
We argue above that §101 is written in broad
terms, but must be read in light of the underlying
limitations on patentability articulated by this Court
in cases like Le Roy. This Court, however, should
provide more specific guidance to help the lower
courts, the BPAI, and the PTO to distinguish
patentable from unpatentable subject matter.
The Court need not entirely re-invent the wheel.
Both tests developed by the Federal Circuit in recent
years shed some light on the issue. The problem with
the machine-or-transformation analysis is not that
examining whether a claimed invention is “tied to a
particular
machine”
or
involves
a
physical
“transformation” is never helpful. To the contrary, in
the context of electromechanical devices, a tie to a
particular machine helps to insure, for example,
against the kind of overbreadth discussed in Morse.
Industrial Age apparatuses and processes are
inherently defined or limited by the physical-
mechanical design of the machines involved. Cf.
Corning v. Burden, 56 U.S. 252, 267 (1853)
(suggesting that machines are patentable because
they necessarily “produce a certain effect or result”).
But the same cannot be said in the computer age. A
primary benefit of modern computer hardware is
that a broad range of processes can be run on a
single device, limited only by the ingenuity and skill
of the programmer. Accordingly, a tie to a “general
purpose” computer should not mean that any process
is patentable, but neither should it mean that no

30
process is. It simply means that a tie to a machine is
no longer an adequate test for patentability.
For such claims, State Street offers some help by
looking to the result, rather than to ill-adapted
physicality requirements. In many cases, a concrete,
useful, and tangible result will suffice to distinguish
a patentable application of an abstract principle from
the unpatentable idea itself. As a general matter, a
computer-implemented
process—like
the
MP3
algorithm—that yields a specific concrete, useful,
and tangible result will resemble a human-created
tool rather than the kind of “natural law” or
“fundamental truth” that Le Roy suggested should be
held in common by all.
But the “concrete, useful, and tangible” test does
not really address Le Roy’s other concern—i.e., that a
patent should not issue when it would be so broad or
vague as to impede future innovation. Accordingly,
while the machine-or-transformation test runs the
risk
of
underinclusiveness
with
regard
to
contemporary processes like MP3 technology, State
Street—as Justice Breyer observed in Lab. Corp.
appears overinclusive.
Below, Yahoo! argued that the State Street focus
on results is incomplete because this Court has
consistently taken care to examine not only the
result, but also the particularity of the process by
which that result is reached. Consistent with Le
Roy’s prohibition on patents that would “preempt”
innovation, only a patent on a specific way of
reaching
a
result
should
be
patentable.
An application must be “sufficiently definite to
confine the patent monopoly within rather definite
bounds,” Benson, 409 U.S. at 69, because a general

31
patent on all ways of reaching a result would create
the kind of monopoly that inhibits innovation. Yahoo!
has described this analysis of the breadth of the
claimed process as an inquiry into whether the
process sets forth a series of “clearly defined steps”
that are “stable, predictable, and reproducible.”
Although this Court’s cases do not use those
terms, they do appear to examine the claims for
stability, predictability, and reproducibility.5 In
Flook, for example, the Court emphasized that the
claims as a whole did not adequately describe a
specific process for incorporating the calculated
alarm limit into the catalytic conversion process:
The patent application does not purport
to explain how to select the appropriate
margin of safety, the weighting factor,
or any of the other variables. Nor does it
purport to contain any disclosure
relating to the chemical processes at
work,
the
monitoring
of
process
variables, or the means of setting off an
alarm or adjusting an alarm system. All
that it provides is a formula for
computing an updated alarm limit.
437 U.S. at 586; see also Diehr, 450 U.S. at 192 n.14
(emphasizing that these shortcomings had been
5 The core concept of stable, predictable, and reproducible
claims harkens back to the Patent Act of 1790, which insisted
that patent descriptions “shall be so particular, and said models
so exact, as not only to distinguish the invention or discovery
from other things before known and used, but also to enable a
workman or other person skilled in the art or manufacture … to
make, construct, or use the same.” 1 Stat. 109, 110.

32
critical to the decision in Flook). In short, in this
Court’s view, the application revealed no specific,
reproducible process, but only an idea for a
mathematical computation.
The Diehr Court also examined the specific steps
claimed there. The Court found that “respondents’
claims describe in detail a step-by-step method for
accomplishing [the curing of synthetic rubber]
beginning with the loading of a mold with raw,
uncured rubber and ending with the eventual
opening of the press at the conclusion of the cure.”
450 U.S. at 184. In the Court’s view, the fact that the
application disclosed a particular process rather than
a broad idea that could be accomplished through a
variety of processes was critical to holding that the
claims as a whole were patent-eligible. Diehr thus
confirms that under §101 it is significant whether
the claimed process is sufficiently stable, predictable,
and reproducible, as well as whether there is a
useful, concrete, and tangible result. As the Court
put it over a century ago, “[w]hoever discovers that a
certain useful result will be produced in any art by
the use of certain means is entitled to a patent for it”
Tilghman v. Proctor, 102 U.S. 707, 728 (1881)
(emphasis added).
In urging the Court to recognize that a patent
may issue only for a particular, step-by-step process
set forth by the application—a process that is stable,
predictable, and reproducible—Yahoo! seeks to
refocus the patentability analysis on the core policies
underlying the Patent Act and this Court’s decisions.
A patentable process must both describe an
application of a principle rather than an abstract
idea, and it must describe that application in a way

33
that is sufficiently detailed and circumscribed to
allow ample space for future innovation. Cf. Morse,
56 U.S. at 119 (an inventor must “specif[y] the
means he uses in a manner so full and exact that
anyone skilled in the science ... can, by using the
means he specifies, without any addition to or
subtraction from them, produce precisely the result
he describes”). Sufficient specificity to ensure that
the process may be predictably and reliably
reproduced will protect future inventors from
wrongful claims of patent infringement. In contrast,
a process that may consist of one set of steps today
and another tomorrow occupies a vague and ever-
shifting patentable space, and would-be innovators
could not know what is protected and what remains
fair game.
Finally, it bears emphasis that Yahoo!’s focus on
the stability, predictability, and reproducibility of the
process itself, as well as on a concrete, useful, and
tangible result, should not be taken to embrace the
mistaken notion that patentable claims must
describe every detail of the process. Consider the
invention in Neilson v. Thompson, Web. P.C. 275,
discussed at length in Tilghman, 102 U.S. at 722-26.
Neilson invented a process for introducing hot air
into a furnace by heating the air in a receptacle
between a blowing apparatus and the furnace. Id. at
725.
Notably,
however,
Neilson
claimed
“no
particular mode of constructing the receptacle, or of
heating it”; his invention lay in using a receptacle to
heat air before introducing it into a furnace. Id. at
726. This invention is stable, predictable, and
reproducible regardless of the shape of the receptacle
or the nature of the heat source, and claims need not
contain that level of specificity. In contrast, Morse’s

34
claim for any way of using electro-magnetism to
print at a distance is just an idea—there is no way to
reliably reproduce it unless much more is known
about the nature of the invention. But if Morse’s
description of a specific, wired telegraph device to
communicate over distance had included a disclaimer
that it would not matter what kind of wires were
used, the invention would have remained patentable
notwithstanding that lack of specificity. The key
question is whether the invention can be reliably
reproduced, not whether every detail is articulated
by the claims. See Cochrane v. Deener, 94 U.S. 780,
788 (1877) (noting that the process in that case
“requires that certain things should be done with
certain substances, and in a certain order; but the
tools to be used in doing this may be of secondary
consequence”).
IV.
BILSKI’S INVENTION IS NOT PATENT-
ELIGIBLE.
Under the test proposed by Yahoo!—which
focuses on both the result a process produces as well
as the steps by which that result is achieved—the
patent application in this case was properly rejected.
Below, Bilski argued that the claimed method
“produces ‘a useful, concrete, and tangible result’”
because it enables commodities suppliers and
consumers to lessen their risk from varying prices
caused by fluctuations in the demand for the
commodity. See App. Supp. Br. 3. But the
implementing steps of Bilski’s process are so
inadequately defined that they cannot be reliably
followed to produce the result in a stable,
predictable, or reproducible manner. For example,
both the first and third limitations of the claim

35
involve “initiating a series of transactions.” There
are, however, many ways to initiate a series of
transactions, and the claim as a whole provides no
constraint, structure, or definition to explain how
these steps are to be performed. In short, these steps
are so indefinite that they represent essentially no
limitation at all. Accordingly, the claim as written is
“so abstract and sweeping” that it would “wholly pre-
empt” the use of any means to achieve the intended
result. See Benson, 409 U.S. at 68-72. As such,
Bilski’s application essentially attempts to broadly
patent the idea of hedging, at least with respect to
commodities trading, and should be held not to state
statutory subject matter.
Notably, however, that does not mean that no
application for a hedging process could be patent-
eligible. If Bilski had developed a process that, in
machine-like fashion, directed commodities traders
to take a clearly defined series of steps to hedge their
positions, that process might lead to useful, concrete,
and tangible results. Such a process would be a man-
made tool for achieving a particular result, not an
unpatentable law of nature. In addition, a patent for
such a specific process would not broadly preempt
other methods of hedging, so it would not foreclose
innovators
from
developing
superior
hedging
processes. Again, though, Bilski’s claim is anything
but a clearly defined series of steps that are stable,
predictable, and reproducible—and that failure,
rather than the absence of a machine or a physical
transformation, is why it should not be patent-
eligible.

36
CONCLUSION
The Court should uphold the Federal Circuit’s
rejection of Bilski’s patent application, but should
also hold that the Federal Circuit erred by
concluding that the machine-or-transformation test
is the definitive test for determining patent
eligibility. The Court should adopt a test derived
from the broad language of §101 and this Court’s
decisions focusing on its meaning—a test under
which a process application is patent-eligible if it
sets forth a defined series of steps that are stable,
predictable, and reproducible and lead to results that
are useful, concrete, and tangible.
Respectfully submitted.
DUANE R. VALZ
CHRISTOPHER J. WRIGHT *
Yahoo! Inc.
TIMOTHY J. SIMEONE
701 First Avenue
JOSEPH C. CAVENDER
Sunnyvale, CA 94089
Wiltshire & Grannis LLP
(408) 349 3300
Washington, D.C. 20036
(202) 730 1300
*Counsel of Record
AUGUST 2009